Myes Hall

Past Course Descriptions

Course Listings - Fall 2006

Geography Department
Course Descriptions Fall
2006

GEOG 101S - Cultural Geography
4 credit hours
Keiffer, Artimus

Prerequisites: None

The objective of this course is to provide knowledge and understanding of the cultural patterns created through human interactions with the environment and the processes responsible for cultural change. Topics will include: origins of culture in prehistory, human adaptations to the natural environment, the impact of different resource systems (hunting-gathering, agrarian, industrial) on nature in historical and spatial perspective, the creation of culture areas of the world, how states influence cultural survival, and the impact of globalization. The course will follow a lecture/discussion format to enhance critical thinking and writing abilities.

GEOG 220N - Physical Geography
4 credit hours
Lenz, Ralph

Prerequisites: Math Placement 22

Climate, vegetation, soils, and landform formation processes all influence human activity in any region; they are the focus of this process-oriented study of the physical environment. Heat and water budgets and their influence upon ecosystem development as well as fluvial, glacial, and coastal land shaping processes will be studied. Relationships between human activity and various physical environments of the world provide a central theme. Evaluation will be based on four exams and numerous in-class lab exercises.

GEOG 230S - Urban Geography
4 credit hours
Medvedkov, Olga

Prerequisites: Math Placement 22

World urbanization has increased dramatically in the course of the 20 and 21 st centuries. About 50% of the global population lives in cities now verses to 5% in the 1800s. Developed countries are 73% urbanized, with Europe and Russia facing shrinking population. Developing countries with large portion of their population in rural areas face an extremely fast rate of urbanization, and lead the world in number of mega-cities, often surrounded by shanty towns. What is the origin of urban growth and decline? What is the spatial organization of a settlement’s network? What is the structure of the land use in North American cities, and how different it is from European, Russian, and Latin American, and Asian centers? All these questions require that cities be constantly rediscovered. The emphasis will be on American cities with their long standing inner-city/suburb dichotomy. A lecture/discussion format is anticipated. Field

assignments connect theories to the real world. There will be two exams, one oral report, a final paper, several field projects, and multiple computer assignments targeting urban management issues.

GEOG 250 C W - Geography of Middle America
4 credit hours
Keiffer, Artimus

Prerequisites: None

One of the most geographically complex regions of the Americas is located in the middle of north and south. It is a region rich with history, tradition, tropical climates, unstable political and economic systems, which are each unique to various parts of the region. From the indigenous to the colonial to the globalized, this area has seen a tremendous amount of influence and change from the outside over the years. Today, it is a complex land that is being exploited for its resources and depleted of its culture. It contains the fastest growing population on the planet, high rates of rural to urban migration, and some of the potential cures for disease in its diminishing rainforests. This class will systematically explore the early to the late civilizations, and compare, perhaps, which were more civilized. It will compare subsistence agriculture to agri-business and see which is more effective. It will look at the social stratification of the people who live there and see why there is much discontent. Students will be asked to do a research project that is of interest to them in their field of study. Additionally, the class will explore some of the food, music, and religious traditions that make this part of the world one of the most fascinating yet highly misunderstood regions of the world.

GEOG 290 S - Business Geographics
4 credit hours
Medvedkov, Olga

Prerequisites: None

Geography plays in increasingly important role in many business decisions. In fact, a surprisingly large amount of information is geographical in character. It is related to such features as zip codes, street addresses, company or school locations, census tracts, cities or states. Micro marketing is gaining in importance because supply and demand is structured geographically. Until recently, business examined geography with colored pencils on legal pads or by pushing pins into wall maps. There is a better way. Business Geographics allows students to have hands-on experience in handling data and maps in a computer lab. This course brings the power of visualization into solutions of real world problems such as marketing, direct customer targeting, finding potential customers, site selection, and international trade. During the course, students will conduct several projects analyzing spatially business data, handling database conversion, geocoding, managing GPS, and mapping. The final project is centered on local business or public issues.

GEOG 380 01 - Map Interpretation
3 credit hours
Lenz, Ralph

Prerequisites: Math basic skills and GEOG or GEOL 101 or a 200 level course in GEOG, GEOL, or BIOL A methods course designed to introduce interpretation principles for maps this course is designed for majors and minors in geography or geology (and biology students with an ecology focus). A programmed instruction approach is followed, which means that students will learn primarily through their work on laboratory exercises. Brief explanations in lecture format will precede each topic. Evaluation will be based on lab assignments and exercises (about 50%), several quizzes, and two exams.

  • © 2012 Wittenberg University
  • Post Office Box 720
  • Springfield, Ohio 45501
  • Ph: 800-677-7558
Translate This Page
 
English