Myes Hall

Past Course Descriptions

Course Listings - Fall 2006

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC
Curricular offerings for
Fall Semester 2006

I -- M U S I C E N S E M B L E S

All students may participate in a variety of choral and instrumental music ensembles. Music majors and minors must fulfill the ensemble requirement in their designated programs. Initial placement in an ensemble is determined by means of an interview or audition with the ensemble conductor; chamber ensembles are formed when sufficient interest warrants. Successful participation in a music ensemble may earn one credit each semester toward the maximum allowed in the student’s degree program. Please contact the ensemble conductor for further information.

Instrumental Ensembles

Music 171 - Brass Choir, Daniel Zehringer
Music 173 - Handbell Choir, Trudy Faber
Music 177 - Chamber Orchestra, Staff
Music 179 - Symphonic Band, Staff

Choral and Vocal Ensembles

Music 183 - Opera Studio, Kenneth Scheffel
Music 185 - Wittenberg Choir, Donald Busarow
Music 187 - Wittenberg Singers, Carol Todd
Music 189 - Chamber Singers, Joyce Wendel

II -- G E N E R A L M U S I C C O U R S E S

The student may enroll in the following General Music courses to satisfy 1) the requirements of the General Education Program (usually applicable to Fine, Performing, and Literary Arts or Western Historical Perspectives or Non-Western Cultures: please check the Schedule of Classes for precise designations); 2) certain requirements in the music major or minor; or 3) the desire for elective credit. The courses are leveled in accord with the guidelines given below, which serve as prerequisites.

Courses at the A “100” level -- Generally open to all students. Such courses assume no particular familiarity with music and tend to emphasize a substantial number of listening experiences.

Courses at the A “200” level -- The ability to read music and some experience in listening to music are recommended. Most courses at this level are writing-intensive and presume the successful completion of English 101.

Courses at the A “300” level -- Because standard college-level music texts may be used, the ability to read music is required. Students should have the ability to read critically from musical scores and literary sources of the period. Junior standing is recommended.

Music 100A Fundamentals of Music : Studio
4 Credits
Chen, Peng

A course surveying the practical fundamentals of music, taught at instruments in the electronic keyboard laboratory. Reading and written assignments are de-emphasized -- the focus is on actively learning musical concepts, such as score reading, melody, harmony, and improvisation at the keyboard. Students will also be exposed to the margins of music and technology through such mediums as MIDI. Designed for those with little or no piano experience, the course has no prerequisites, but students must be willing to devote daily practice time to the mastering of cumulative skills. There will be a few written quizzes, but most of the examinations will consist of short exercises and performances at the keyboard. $5 Charge for headphone use.

Music 101A Elementary Music Theory
4 Credits
Busarow, Donald

A course designed for the non-major who wants to learn about basic music theory including scales, intervals, triads, keys, counterpoint, harmony, and analysis. A rudimentary ability to read music is helpful. The course includes extensive daily written and aural skills work, including sight-singing, performing rhythms, and dictation. Evaluation is by graded homework, written tests administered regularly throughout the course, and a final exam. By the end of the semester the successful student should have sufficient knowledge of the fundamentals of music to support additional music course work.

Music 102A Basic Music Theory & Skills
4 Credits
Kazez, Daniel

This course is designed to help students analyze and compose music using Western conventions developed over the past thousand years. Both classical and popular music styles are studied. Proficiency in music reading is expected and required for this class. Students without the ability to read music should not register for this course. Grading is based on homework, tests, and a term project.

Music 110A Understanding Music
4 Credits
Siek, Stephen

A basic introductory course designed to explore some of the great works of musical art. The materials of music, such as melody, harmony, rhythm, and texture are examined in their historical contexts from the Medieval period to the present. Various forms of musical expression such as the fugue, sonata form, and theme and variations are also surveyed. Listening to a wide variety of music and attendance at concerts is required. The text is Music Listening Today by Charles Hoffer (Third Edition, Thomson/Schirmer).

Music 110A Understanding Music
4 Credits
Zehringer, Daniel

A basic introductory course emphasizing aural perceptual skills and designed to enable the student to appreciate some of the great works of musical art. Explores the materials of music, i.e., melody, harmony, rhythm, tone color, form and mediums of expression. Surveys the basic style periods of music. Required outside listening to a wide variety of music and attendance at selected, appropriate live performances. Assessment is by regular testing throughout the course, and a functional final exam.

III -- A P P L I E D M U S I C L E S S O N S

Music 121 - 146 -- Applied Music Lessons
1 to 2 Credits
Staff

Applied music lessons are available for all students regardless of major. Please consult the Schedule for a complete list of offerings.

Music 321 - 346 - Advanced Applied Music Lessons
1 to 2 Credits
Staff

Students may take advanced applied lessons only after passing an examination in the applied area.

Enrollment and scheduling - Initial enrollment and teacher assignment can be arranged by contacting the chairperson of the Department of Music in Krieg Hall. At the time of the first lesson, the student’s level and course of study will be determined. In Applied Organ, Piano, and Voice, it may be necessary for students to audition in order to ascertain the suitability of applied study and to arrange for teacher assignment. If the student does not read music, enrollment in Music 100 (Fundamentals of Music: A Studio Course) may be recommended in order to establish enough background so that the student can practice independently and in a profitable manner. Because applied lessons are individually scheduled, it is necessary for continuing students to file copies of their proposed schedules with the departmental office before registering with the Registrar’s Office each semester lessons are taken.

Credit - Normally, weekly private lessons during the fifteen-week semester are 30 minutes in length and earn one credit. The expected time for practice is at least one hour a day. Should desire and program permit, it is possible to enroll for a 60-minute lesson every week and earn two credits. The expectations for practice time increase proportionately. The grade earned will be figured into the cumulative grade-point-average of the student.

Fees - During the 2006-2007 academic year, the fee for private applied music lessons is $300 for each credit taken. The applied music fee is usually waived if the lessons are part of the requirements for a major or a minor in music. Generally, for the minor, only one credit is waived each semester.

Practice rooms - Every student who is registered for applied music lessons may reserve suitable practice space of Krieg Hall. Since most practice rooms are always kept locked, a key deposit is required of those students who use them. Please consult the departmental office in order to obtain a key and to schedule practice rooms and rehearsal space. NOTE: Only students who are involved in the programs of the Department of Music, i.e., applied lessons or ensembles, may use a practice room.

Lockers - Lockers with combination locks for the storage of music and musical instruments are available in Krieg Hall and may be reserved by contacting the office of the Department of Music, Krieg 301B. Liability coverage is the responsibility of the student.
 

IV -- I N T E N S I V E M U S I C C O U R S E S

The following intensive courses in music are open to all students with the permission of the instructor; they are primarily designed for the music major. Further information about the courses may be obtained from the departmental office.

Music 199 - Music Practicum
0 Credit
Scheffel, Kenneth

Monitors attendance and participation by the music major at concert and recital events, at special workshops and clinics. Includes attending or participating in a monthly student recital. Required of all majors every semester.

Music 207H American Music, 1620-1900
4 Credits
Siek, Stephen

The course surveys, through written and recorded examples, the most important collections and musical compositions that characterized the cultural climate of the New World from Colonial times through the nineteenth century. Musical materials associated with the Pilgrims, the Puritans, the Federalist era, and the Civil War are examined, as well as the music of African-Americans, early American theater, and specific composers such as William Billings and Stephen Foster. The course emphasizes a strong historical-sociological thrust, and it is hoped that the musical content will serve to promote a greater understanding of America’s early history. The course features some visual material, such as films and slides. The text is Music in the New World by Charles Hamm. (Norton, 1983.) Writing intensive.

Music 221 Advanced Keyboard Skills and Improvisation
2 Credits
Durrenberger, Christopher

Prerequisite: Music 120 or permission .

A course designed to further develop basic keyboard skills needed by music majors. Advanced levels of theory, keyboard technique harmonization and improvisation will be covered. Taught in the electronic keyboard lab. Every year.

Music 232 - Brass Instruments
1 Credit
Zehringer, Daniel

Prerequisites: Music 165 or permission of Chair

This course is for music majors. Applied class instruction will be given in all of the brass instruments, with emphasis on teaching techniques and procedures. Available resources and teaching materials will also be surveyed.

Music 250 - Technology for Music Educators
2 Credits
Staff

Prerequisites: Music 165 or permission of Chair

An introduction to the many uses of technology in Music Education. Students learn how to use MIDI, digital audio and video, music notation programs, and sequencing programs. Grading will be based on completing a series of projects to prove competency in each area.

Music 251 – Beginning Comp. with the Computer
2 Credits
Staff

Prerequisites: Music 101A and permission of Chair

An introduction to basics of composition utilizing computers and synthesizers. The student will learn how to write a melody, countermelody and accompaniment as well as utilize basic forms. At the same time, the student will develop proficiency in the basic use of MIDI and the Finale music notation program. The student’s grade will be based on homework and composition projects.

Music 257 Intermediate Music Theory II
2 Credits
Busarow, Donald

Prerequisite: Music 155 & Music 156 .

Since this course resumes study after a three-month recess, the first week is spent reviewing all four-part writing principles of the Common Practice Period, beginning with secondary dominants, the last area studied in Music 155. The text used is Walter Piston’s Harmony, fifth edition (continued from Music 155). The course then proceeds with studies in musical texture, diminished seventh chords, non-dominant sevenths, dominant ninths, elevenths, and thirteenths, augmented sixths, Neapolitans, and other chromatic chords. A final project consists of an original composition based upon a text selected by the student, an original melody and four-part harmonization incorporating as much of the harmonic vocabulary available to the student following completion of this course.

Music 258 Intermediate Music Skills II
2 Credits
Kazez, Daniel

Prerequisite: Music 155 & Music 156 or equivalent, or by examination.

Includes two related components: (1) Singing: Students learn to sing pitch patterns and rhythm patterns, in order to facilitate their playing, singing, conducting, composing, and studying of music. Significant and regular outside practice is required. Grading is based on in-class performance. (2) Ear Training: Students learn to notate pitch patterns and rhythm patterns presented aurally. Students learn to write down music they hear or create. Grading is based on dictation exams.

Music 301H 1W History of Western Music to 1750
4 Credits
Faber, Trudy

Prerequisite: English 101E

A study of the important musical developments from early Greek music, through the Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque periods, and of the composers whose creativity brought new ideas to fruition. Topics include: chant and early polyphony, Ars Antiqua and Ars Nova, the development of the Franco- Netherlands style, music of the Reformation and Counter-Reformation, Italian monody, opera and opera-related forms, instrumental music of the Baroque and especially the music of Bach, Vivaldi, and Handel. Although the course format is generally lecture/discussion/listening, there will also be videos and live performances on organ and harpsichord. Required for music majors. Writing intensive.

Music 350 Conducting
2 Credits
Staff

Prerequisite: Music 257 or permission of Chair .

Introduces and develops the skills necessary for a musician to conduct an ensemble. The style and mechanics of the physical act of conducting are discussed each class period. The student applies this knowledge by conducting an ensemble consisting of members of the class. A daily grade will be given for individual preparation and class participation. There will be discussions and written exams covering musical terminology and instrumental transposition as found in scores. Each week exercises that develop coordination and rhythm will be performed and graded. The course will conclude with a discussion of various methods of score study and score preparation. Alternate years.

Music 355 - Studies in Counterpoint
3 Credits
Staff

Prerequisite: Music 257 or permission of Chair .

Designed to develop an awareness and understanding of contrapuntal writing and techniques through reading, analysis of musical examples, workbook exercises, and original composition. Alternate years.

Music 463 General Music Methods
3 Credits
Joyce Wendel

Prerequisite: Music 165, Education 103S or EDUC 104R or permission of instructor.

This course is designed for the student seeking licensure in music. An intensive study of educational programming for musical experiences in the elementary general music class in the public schools. Focus is on strategies to design meaningful learning experiences in the musical classroom, including the current trends in music education, Orff, Kodaly, Dalcroze, as well as integrative curricula. Instruction is provided in curriculum design, writing goals and objectives, lesson planning, motivational techniques, assessment of student needs and accomplishments, communication skills, and the use of media and technology in the classroom. The acquisition of materials and resources for the general music teacher emphasized. Also includes field experience and exploratory teaching. Alternate years.

Music 490 - Independent Study
2 to 12 Credits
Staff

Prerequisite: Departmental permission.

Individual project as arranged by the student with the supervising professor and the Department Chair. May be writing intensive.

Music 491 – Internship
2 to 4 Credits
Staff

Prerequisite: Departmental permission.

Supervised learning-work experience at various on- or off-campus sites generally taken the senior year. Usually involves a written report, a journal, or other assignments.

Music 495 1W - Senior Recital/Paper
2 Credits
Staff

Prerequisite: At least three terms of advanced study in the primary area of applied music, senior standing, concurrent registration in the area of advanced applied study, and permission of the department Chair.

Presentation of a full-length recital in the primary area of applied music study. A challenging program to be determined in consultation with the applied music teacher. Designed as a culmination of preceding studies. A written paper of moderate length and relating to some aspect of the program is also required. Required of Bachelor of Music degree students. An oral examination, reviewing and assessing the student’s previous work in all areas of the music major, concludes the course. Students qualified to pursue departmental honors will register for Music 496 with permission of the department chair. Writing intensive.

Music 496 - Senior Recital & Paper with Honors
2 Credits
Staff

Prerequisite: At least three terms of advanced study in the primary area of applied music, senior standing, and concurrent registration in the area of advanced applied study and permission of the department chair.

Presentation of a full-length recital in the primary area of applied music study. A challenging program to be determined in consultation with the applied music teacher. Designed as a culmination of preceding studies. A written paper of moderate length and relating to some aspect of the program is also required. Required of Bachelor of Music degree students. An oral examination, reviewing and assessing the student’s previous work in all areas of the music major, concludes the course. Writing intensive.

Music 497 - Senior Portfolio Review
0 Credit
Staff

Prerequisite: Departmental permission.

Presentation of selected classwork and related materials and resources and the demonstration of musical skills and competencies in an oral examination format before a committee of three faculty members. Required of the major in music education. The review and examination should occur at the beginning of the senior year and at least one full semester prior to the student taking Education 495: Student Teaching.

Music 498 - Senior Project
2 Credits
Staff

Prerequisite: Departmental permission.

Full-scale investigation of a selected topic or a production of a creative project. Usually presented in a written form. The project is juried by a committee of three faculty members. Both the project and the committee should be determined by the end of the student’s junior year and in consultation with the academic adviser and the department chair. An oral examination, reviewing and assessing the student’s previous work in all areas of the music major, concludes the course. Students qualified to pursue departmental honors will register for Music 499 with permission of the department chair. Writing intensive.

Music 499 -Senior Project with Honors
2 Credits
Staff

Prerequisite: Departmental permission.

Full-scale investigation of a selected topic or a production of a creative project. Usually presented in a written form. The project is juried by a committee of three faculty members. Both the project and the committee should be determined by the end of the student’s junior year and in consultation with the academic adviser and the department chair. An oral examination, reviewing and assessing the student’s previous work in all areas of the music major, concludes the course. Writing intensive.  

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