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Past Course Descriptions

Course Listings - Fall 2008

Psychology Department
Fall 2008
Course Descriptions

PSYC 100: Understanding Psychology
4 semester hours
Crane, Lauren, Staff

Prerequisites: None
An introductory-level survey course in psychology with a focus on how psychology can be applied to other fields of study and life in general; intended for students who do not plan to major or minor in psychology. Covers topics in biological foundations of behavior, learning and memory, developmental psychology, motivation and emotion, abnormal psychology and psychotherapy, personality, and social psychology. This course is not to be taken in conjunction with or in addition to Psychology courses 110-160.

PSYC 107 Statistics
4 semester hours
Brown, Cliff

Prerequisites: Toregister for Psychology 107, a student must have a 23 or higher Mathematics Placement Level.Contact the Math Workshop for details regarding this prerequisite. A student may not receive credit for more than one statistics course.
This is a course in applied statistics. Its emphasis is on the mechanics of summarizing and analyzing data, with examples from the behavioral sciences. The purpose of the course is to prepare students for other courses in Psychology and related disciplines and to help them conduct and interpret statistical analyses.

PSYC 120: Proseminar II: Learning
2 semester hours
Anes, Michael

Prerequisites: None
This course is an introduction to the scientific bases, methods, theories, and findings in the study of learning and memory in humans and animals. Includes operant conditioning laboratoryexercises. Grade is based on two exams, lab performance, and a written lab log. In addition, students are required either to participate in a limited number of research studies or to write a research paper. There are also two short papers; one is on a laboratory exercise and the other is a movie analysis.

PSYC 130: Proseminar III: Developmental
2 semester hours
Zembar, Mary Jo

Prerequisites: None
This course examines development across the life span. The first half of the course focuses on prenatal development and the changes in physical, motor, cognitive and social skills that take place in the early years of life. The second half of the course focuses on developmental issues unique to adolescents (puberty, at-risk behavior) adults(marriage, career development) and the aged (retirement, Alzheimer's disease). Students are required to participate in a limited number of research studies and to gain practical experience with children and adults by completing an observational and interview project.

PSYC 207: Experimental Design
5 semester hours
Anes, Michael

Prerequisite: Psychology 107 or another statistics course.
This laboratory course offers a systematic introduction to relevant aspects of the scientific enterprise, namely the design and analysis of experiments. The focus of the course is on the design of experiments in an analyzable manner, and on their subsequent statistical analysis. In the laboratory, participants will perform statistical analysis by calculator and computer. Course performance evaluation is based on lab projects, tests, and class participation. Considerable discussion is devoted to the nature and limitation of scientific models and scientific knowledge. Text: Elmes, Kantowitz, & Roediger, Research Methods in Psychology. 8th edition, St. Paul, MN: West Pub. Co.

PSYC 231: Child Development
4 semester hours
Zembar, Mary Jo

Prerequisite: Psychology 130 or Education 111.
The developmental study of children from prenatal development to preadolescence, with emphasis on motor, cognitive, language, social and personality development. Monthly observations of infants and children help students apply theoretical developmental models and research findings. Service-learning 100 is an available option. Final grade is based on essay exams, observation projects, and service-learning participation.

PSYC 242: Industrial Organizational Psychology
4 semester hours
Brookings, Jeffrey

Industrial/Organizational (IO) Psychology involves the application of psychological theory and research to understanding and improving job performance. Work behavior may be studied from multiple perspectives (e.g., organizational, cultural, societal); because this is a psychology course, we will look at job behavior primarily from the perspectives of the individual worker and the employer. That is, we will emphasize what individual workers do on the job, how well they do it, how we select and train people to do their jobs, and how we compensate them fairly for their work. In addition, we will consider the effects of context-organizational variables, the physical environment, and employment law-on worker performance. Finally, because we are concerned with employees' well-being, as well as their performance, we will explore current issues (e.g., drug testing, sexual harassment, organizational innovations, workplace violence) that affect the quality of work life. Three exams, a final exam, and a term project.

PSYC 251: Abnormal Psychology
4 semester hours
Staff

Prerequisite: Psychology 150
A study of the causes, diagnosis and treatment of psychological disorders in adults. Various theories, models and diagnostic and therapeutic procedures are investigated in the context of research and case studies. An advanced course which primarily serves students interested in clinical psychology, social work, counseling, and related health specialties.

PSYC 280: Psychology & Culture
4 semester hours
Crane, Lauren

Prerequisite: None
People cannot speak without having an accent from somewhere. In much the same way, people's psychological functioning is not accent-free.This course highlights the extent to which all levels of psychological functioning, even "basic" ones, are grounded in culture-specific assumptions about what matters, what is "good," and how the world works. Students are expected to emerge from this class with a sharpened ability to critique generalizations made about human psychology, a greater appreciation of interpersonal diversity, and a richer understanding of how their own ways of thinking and being derive from culture-bound experiences. Course requirements include exams, response papers, a research project, and class participation.

PSYC 311: Behavioral Neuroscience
5 semester hours
Wilson, Jo

Prerequisites: Psychology 107 or another statistics course and Psychology 110.
This course provides the student with a solid background in the biological basis of behavior. Topics covered in lectures include the study of neurons, gross and fine neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, sensory systems, and the physiological basis of motivation (thirst, hunger, sex, and sleep), emotions, learning, memory, brain damage and psychopathology. Final grade is based on four tests, in different formats, a final exam, and laboratory reports on weekly 3-hour laboratory sessions.

PSYC 361:Experimental Social Psychology
5 semester hours
Brown, Clifford

Prerequisites:Psychology 107,Psychology 160, and Psychology 207.
This writing intensive course in experimental social psychology provides students with a scientifically based understanding of human social behavior. Topics include social perception, attitudes, conformity, group processes, aggression, and prejudice. The course emphasizes the experimental method and the particular challenges of applying it to study people in a social context. Given the complexity of social behavior, social psychology relies heavily on experiments that employ factorial designs which allow investigators to examine the independent and combined effects of several factors (variables) simultaneously. This course will include more than 30 hours of laboratory experience.

PSYC 390: Junior Seminar
No Credit
Wilson, Josephine

This seminar meets one hour per week and is designed to help students understand their various options as psychology majors. This includes topics such as senior research projects and internships, senior comprehensive and GRE exams, possible career paths, graduate school applications, and graduate school and job interviews. This class may include guest speakers and field trips based on students' interests. Psychology majors are required to take this no-credit seminar for one semester during their junior year.

PSYC 400: Self Regulation
4 semester hours
Brookings, Jeffrey

Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor
In this course, students will design and complete one or more research studies on self-regulation of behavior. Students will participate in designing the studies, collecting, and analyzing the data, writing up the results, and submitting them for presentation at a professional conference. Preparation for the research will involve reading and discussing published studies on self-regulation, and becoming proficient with relevant research methodologies and instruments. Course grades are based on class participation and contributions to the project(s).

PSYC 400: Cultural Research in Psychology
4 semester hours
Crane, Lauren

Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor
This course is designed to train students in the skills needed to conduct cultural research studies in psychology. The course format primarily will be that of a lab-oriented seminar. Students will develop and refine their ability to read the psychological literature, to generate and test hypotheses, to collect and statistically analyze original data, and to report and critique research findings. Together we will complete one or more research studies focused on cross-cultural comparison, with the goal of presenting our results at a professional conference. Course grades will be based on class participation, contributions to the research project(s), and research papers written in APA style. This is a Writing Intensive course that meets once a week.

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