Myes Hall

Past Course Descriptions

Course Listings - Fall 2009

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY


BIOLOGY 110 - Survey of Biology
4 credits
Mason, David

Open to all students
Lecture, discussion, and demonstration dealing with such topics as the origin of life, sexual reproduction, diversity, adaptation, heredity, environment, and infectious diseases as they relate to humans. 

 

BIOLOGY 131 - Trees and Shrubs of the Urban and Natural Environments (Woody Plants)
4 credits  
deLanglade , Ron

Open to all students
Will meet R-8 and lab experience for general education requirements or may be counted in Biology major/minor requirements as a botany course.

Course Goals:  This course will focus on the urban and natural environments as related to woody trees and shrubs and vines.  The prime goal of the course is to give the student the necessary framework to understand and be acquainted with the woody plant world around them.

Course Subject: The course is to acquaint the student of the various native and cultivated forms of woody trees, shrubs, and vines as found in natural and urban environments.  Topics to be covered include: basic classification, naming, use of taxonomic keys, life histories, basic growth patterns, culture and care.  Field trips to various local sites will be taken.

Required Text: Graves, Arthur H., Illustrated Guide to Trees and Shrubs

Assessment: Assessment of student achievement of the stated learning goals will be by:          
1.  At least 2 to 3 lecture tests.
2.  2-3 Field identification tests
3.  A specimen collection (made with a partner).
4.  Oral presentation to the class on a specific family containing woody forms.
5.  A scrap book of current articles in the lay press concerning this group of plants.

 

BIOLOGY 143 - Cave Ecology   
4 credits                                                                                       
Hobbs, Horton
                       
Open to all students                                                               
This course is a basic introduction to cave ecology and will follow a lecture-seminar-discussion format with no formal laboratory.  An optional field trip to caves in northeastern Kentucky will be scheduled and mini-projects relating to cave ecology will be carried out on these trips (see Biology 258B – Cave Ecology).  Much of the term will be spent examining speleogenesis, the structure and function of cave ecosystems, as well as the evolutionary biology of obligate cave inhabitants.  The grade is based on class participation, mini-projects, one lecture exam, a term paper, and a final exam.

 

BIOLOGY 170 - Concepts of Biology: Biological Information, Reproduction, and Evolution    
5 credits            
Collier, Matthew
Yoder, Jay

Open to all students planning to major in biology
This course and Biology 180, required for the biology major, provide an overview of the primary concepts in biology and are prerequisites for upper level biology courses.  Students may take Biology 170B and Biology 180B in either order.  The major themes of this course are information flow from DNA to protein, animal reproduction, and evolution.  Students must also enroll in an accompanying lab section (BIOL 171).  The laboratory portion of the course will provide students with hands-on activities designed to reinforce lecture content and develop the basic scientific skills that are needed for future courses in the major.  Offered in the fall semester.

 

BIOLOGY 214 – Developmental Biology 
5 credits
McWhorter, Michelle

Prerequisites:  Biology 170 and 180
Developmental biology is the study of how single celled zygotes (or fertilized eggs) become multi-cellular organisms with specialized tissues and organs.  This course is designed to provide an overview of the major features of animal development focusing primarily on the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie these developmental events.  Lecture topics will include gametogenesis, fertilization, gastrulation, and organogenesis.  Laboratory components will use a range of developmental model organisms to highlight some of the main tenants of developmental biology.  There will be an emphasis on how cells in the developing embryo differentiate into specific cell types, germ layers, tissues, and organs.

 

BIOLOGY 215 – Genetics 
5 credits
Collier, Matthew

Prerequisites:  Biology 170 and 180
This course will examine the scope and significance of modern genetic principles.  Lecture and lab topics will include molecular and Mendelian genetics, protein synthesis, recombinant DNA, genetic engineering, effects of stressors upon genetic systems, human genetics, and population genetics.  Particular attention will be paid to learning how to apply basic genetic principles to biological problems and to developing analytical skills.

 

BIOL 223 - Survey of Human Disease
4 credits                                                                   
Mason, David

Prerequisites:  Biology 170 and 180
This course considers the major diseases that affect the human organism.  It includes what causes the disease, clinical signs and symptoms, treatment, and prevention.  A general overview of disease is considered first, including infections, autoimmune, genetic diseases, and cancer, to be followed by specific disease problems relating to each organ system.

Text: Pathology for the Health-related Professions, Ivan Damjanov

Information on the University class files, Q drive.

 

BIOLOGY 230 - Trees and Shrubs of the Urban and Natural Environments (Woody Plants)
4 credits
deLanglade, Ron

Open to biology majors only
Please see the description of this course listed under Biology 131.   Biology majors and minors who need  this course to count toward the major or the minor should register for Biology 230, rather than Biology 131.

 

BIOLOGY 231 - Vertebrate Zoology    
5 credits                                                                          
Gribbins, Kevin

Prerequisites:  Biology 170 and 180
This course will examine comparatively the structural and functional anatomy of vertebrates using an evolutionary approach.  Lectures will focus on major morphological systems, phylogenetic relationships, natural history and biogeography, and development of the vertebrate groups.  Labs will follow the progression of lecture topics to compare each anatomical system in a diversity of vertebrates.  A field trip to the Newport (KY)  aquarium will introduce students to the great diversity of vertebrate life and provide a basis for writing papers that integrate morphology, function, and ecology.

 

BIOL 234 - Morphology of Non-Vascular Plants
5 credits                                                  
Mason, David

Prerequisites:  Biology 170 and 180
Course Goal:  Provide students with an opportunity to systematically study various nonvascular plants, including:  algae, bacteria, viruses, fungi and bacteria.
Course Topic:  Students study the structure, reproduction, ecology and evolution of algae, bacteria, viruses, fungi and bacteria.
Assessment Methods:  Students are evaluated by a means of lecture and laboratory examinations in addition to credit assigned their field collections. 
Instructional Methods:  This is carried out by means of lecture-discussions, including slide presentations of organisms and laboratory and field experiences.

Laboratory Manual on Nonvascular Plants, and information on the University class files, Q drive.

 

BIOLOGY 243 – Cave Ecology
4 credits
Hobbs, Horton

Open to biology majors only
Please see the description of this course listed under Biology 143.   Biology majors and minors who need  this course to count toward the major or the minor should register for Biology 243, rather than Biology 143, and MUST register for the Biology 258B, Cave Ecology Field Study.

 

BIOLOGY 250 – Vegetation of Ohio
5 credits
Kwit, Charles

Prerequisites:  Biology 170 and 180 or permission
The vegetation of Ohio is both diverse and fascinating.  This course will investigate first-hand a number of exemplary plant communities in the state of Ohio.  It will focus on the species that comprise Ohio’s plant communities (past and present), as well as the forces, factors, and interactions that shape (and sometimes threaten) them.  Special emphasis will be placed on the life histories of the dominant and the endangered plants in the profiled communities.  It will also introduce the development and implementation of plant conservation efforts in the state.  This course fulfills the Area II, Group 3 portion of the biology major requirements and it also counts as a botany course.

 

BIOLOGY 255 - Biological Literacy    
4 credits
Yoder , Jay

Prerequisites:  Biology 170 and 180
A study of common sources, methods, and techniques used in scientific writing and in presenting biological literature.  There will be a strong emphasis on bibliographic sources as well as written and oral presentations of biological material in this writing intensive course.

 

BIOLOGY 255 – Biological Literacy
4 credits
Goodman, Margaret

Prerequisites:  Biology 170 and 180
A study of common sources, methods, and techniques used in scientific writing and in presenting biological literature.  There will be a strong emphasis on bibliographic sources as well as written and oral presentations of biological material in this writing intensive course.

 

BIOLOGY 258 – Extended Field Studies – Evolution
1 credit
Lewis, Timothy

Prerequisites:  Must take concurrently with Biology 347-1W Evolution
This field course is an opportunity for those enrolled in Evolution to study aspects from class.  Open to those concurrently enrolled in Evolution or with permission of instructor.

 

BIOL 258 - Extended Field Studies – Limnology
1 credit                                                    
Hobbs, Horton

Prerequisite:  Must take concurrently with Biology 341
A five-day field trip in south-central Ohio or southwestern Virginia is offered as an optional field experience.

 

BIOLOGY 258 – Extended field Studies – Vegetation of Ohio
1 credit
Kwit, Charles

Prerequisite:  Must take concurrently with biology 250 – Vegetation of Ohio
A four-day field trip to south-central and southeastern Ohio is offered as an optional field experience to study topics from class.  The trip will involve hiking, vegetation surveys, and an introduction to botanical research projects in the area.  Open to those concurrently enrolled in Vegetation of Ohio or with permission of instructor.

 

BIOLOGY 258B - Extended Field Studies - Cave Ecology   
1 credit                                              
Hobbs, Horton

Prerequisite:  Must take concurrently with Biology 143/243
A four-day field trip to Kentucky is offered as an optional field experience (highly recommended and REQUIRED for biology majors enrolled in Biology 243, Cave Ecology).  Please note:  any student participating in this field experience will receive lab credit.

 

BIOLOGY 310 - Molecular Biology   
5 credits                                                                          
Goodman, Margaret

Prerequisites:  Biology 170 and 180 and Chemistry 162, or Biology 312
Molecular Biology will provide an introduction to the molecular biochemistry of cell function, focusing on genetic aspects.  Topics to be discussed include structure of DNA and RNA, transcription, translation, regulation of gene expression, and DNA replication and repair.  This is a writing intensive course, requiring one major paper, one lab report, and in-class essays on lecture exams.  The laboratory portion of the course will focus on techniques used in the molecular biology laboratory, including electrophoresis (both agarose and polyacrylamide), blotting techniques, cloning and PCR.

 

BIOLOGY 325 - Human Anatomy and Physiology  
5 credits
Pederson, Cathy

Prerequisites:  Biology 170 and 180 and one upper-level biology course
Students will learn about the major systems of the human body in both lecture and laboratory.  Topics to be discussed include the musculoskeletal, nervous, endocrine, and reproductive systems.  Disease states will also be discussed.  Laboratories will focus on the anatomy and physiology of each system as they are discussed in the lecture portion of the course.  Laboratories will include dissection.  Assessment will include 3 written examinations, lab practical examinations, and a final examination. Offered every year.  

 

BIOL 341 - Limnology    
5 credits
Hobbs, Horton

Prerequisites:   Biology 170 and 180 and Chemistry 121 and 162
This writing intensive course offers a study of inland aquatic ecosystems with emphasis on lakes and streams.  Physical, chemical, and biological features are studied and numerous field experiences supplement lectures.  Literature reviews and an exhaustive bibliographic research paper concerning an appropriate limnological topic, one lecture test, and three laboratory practicals are parts of the requirements of this lecture/laboratory course. 

 

BIOL 347 - Evolution    
4 credits
Lewis, Timothy

Prerequisites:  Biology 170, 180, and two additional biology courses
Evolution, or genetically based changes in species or populations over time, and natural selection as the mechanism of evolutionary change, have been easily demonstrated and accepted by scientists for over a century.  Evolution forms one of the most fundamental frameworks for studying biology, and yet still creates controversy to the general public, including debates about the merits of including it in high school curricula.  This class will examine the theory, the evidence for it, the way it shapes our understanding of biology, how it is used to preserve rain forests and invent medical cures, and some associated hoaxes.  And, of course, we will examine the issues surrounding evolution as it plays out today.  Classes include significant discussion and lecture components.  There is no associated lab.

 

BIOLOGY 406 - Senior Capstone    
4 credits
Gribbins, Kevin and
Yoder, Jay

Prerequisite:  Must have senior status
The capstone course uses a topic-driven approach to promote synthesis of biological concepts and emphasize the inter-relatedness of different disciplines within biology. These concepts range from the molecular level through organismal biology to populations and ecosystems. The course will rely heavily on the primary literature with emphasis on the process of scientific discovery. In this course students develop skills in presenting scientific material in both oral and written form. This writing-intensive course is required of all biology majors and is to be taken during the senior year.

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