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Past Course Descriptions

Course Listings - Spring 2009

MATH 112 The Language of Mathematics
(4 credits)
Barhorst, Garry

Prerequisite: Math Placement Level 22 or higher
This is an introduction to mathematics at the beginning college level. MATH 112 will explore topics in contemporary mathematics with a problem-solving approach.

The class meetings will include lectures, problem-solving sessions, and group work. The final grade will be based on quizzes, exams, a project, and/or a comprehensive final. This course is not intended to prepare students for further courses in mathematics. Mathematical-reasoning intensive.

MATH 118 Mathematics for Elementary and Middle School Teachers
(4 credits)
Post, Regina

Prerequisite: Math Placement Level 22 or higher
Study of number systems, number theory, patterns, functions, measurement, algebra, logic, probability, and statistics with a special emphasis on the processes of mathematics: problem solving, reasoning and proof, communicating mathematically, and making connections within mathematics and between mathematics and other disciplines. Open only to students intending to major in education. Every year. Mathematical-reasoning intensive.

MATH 119 Geometry with Computer Applications for Elementary and Middle School Teachers
(2 credits)
Post, Regina

Prerequisite: MATH 118
Study of basic concepts of plane and solid geometry, including topics from Euclidean, transformational, and projective geometry with a special emphasis on the processes of mathematics: problem solving, reasoning and proof, communicating mathematically, and making connections among mathematical ideas, real-world experiences, and other disciplines. Includes computer lab experiences using Geometer's Sketchpad. Open only to students majoring in education. Every year. Mathematical-reasoning intensive.

MATH 120 Elementary Functions
(4 credits)
Ben-azzouz, Moez and Johnson, Kathy

Prerequisite: Math Placement Level 24 or higher
This is a standard pre-calculus mathematics course that explores the functions common to the study of calculus. Examination of polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions will be done using algebraic, numeric, and graphical techniques. Applications of these functions in formulating and solving real-world problems will also be discussed.

The final grade in the course will be based on homework, quizzes, tests, and a comprehensive final exam. Students are required to have a TI-83, TI-84, or TI-86 graphing calculator for use in class and for homework assignments. Mathematical-reasoning intensive.

MATH 127 Introductory Statistics
(4 credits)
Andrews, Douglas

Prerequisites: Math Placement Level 23 or higher
A study of statistics as the science of using data to glean insight into real-world problems. Includes principles and methods for describing and summarizing data, sampling procedures and experimental design, inferences about the real-world processes that underlie the data, and student projects for collecting and analyzing data. Open to non-majors only.

Note: A student may receive credit for only one of the following statistics courses: MATH 127, MATH 227, PSYC 107, or MGT 210. Mathematical-reasoning intensive.

MATH 131 Essentials of Calculus
(4 credits)
Mills, Donald

Prerequisite: MATH 120 or Math Placement Level 25
This one semester calculus course is an introduction to the techniques and applications of differential and integral calculus. The applications come primarily from the economics and bio-sciences and do not involve any trigonometric models. The final grade in the course will be based on homework, quizzes, tests, and a comprehensive final exam.

Students are required to have a TI-83, TI-84, or TI-86 graphing calculator for use in class and for homework assignments. Mathematical-reasoning intensive.

Notes: 1. Students may not receive credit for both MATH 131 and MATH 201
2. MATH 131 does not satisfy the prerequisite for MATH 202.
3. Take MATH 131 only if you are POSITIVE that you will take only one semester of calculus at  Wittenberg. Otherwise, you should take MATH 201.

MATH 201 Calculus I
(4 credits)
Mills, Donald

Prerequisite: MATH 120 or Math Placement Level 25
Calculus is the mathematical tool used to analyze changes in physical quantities. This is the first course in the standard calculus sequence. It develops the notion of "derivative", which is used for studying rates of change, and then introduces the concept of "definite integral", which is related to area problems. The overall approach will emphasize the concepts of calculus using graphical, numerical, and symbolic methods.

The two-semester calculus sequence, MATH 201/202, is required for all students majoring or minoring in mathematics, computer science, physics, or chemistry. MATH 201 and MATH 202 can also count as Asupporting science@ courses for the BA and BS programs in Biology, Geology, and Biochemistry/Molecular Biology. Students who are sure they will take only one semester of calculus may be better served in the single-semester introduction to calculus, MATH 131: AEssentials of Calculus@. Talk with your advisor or with any math professor for advice on which calculus course is most appropriate for you.

Normally, students are required to have a TI-83, TI-84, or TI-86 graphing calculator for use in class, for homework assignments, and for tests. If you have a different calculator that you'd like to use for the class, contact the instructor to find out whether your calculator is appropriate.

Depending on the instructor, the final grade in the course could be based on homework, quizzes, tests, and a comprehensive final exam. Mathematical-reasoning intensive.

NOTE: Students may not receive credit for both MATH 131 and MATH 201.

MATH 202 Calculus II
(4 credits)
Parker, Adam

Prerequisite: MATH 201
This is the second course in Wittenberg's three semester calculus sequence. MATH 202 is primarily concerned with integration and power series representations of functions. Topics covered include indefinite and definite integrals, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, integration techniques, approximations of definite integrals, improper integrals, applications of integrals, power series, Taylor's Series, geometric series, and convergence tests for series.

Normally, students are required to have a TI-83, TI-84, or TI-86 graphing calculator for use in class, for homework assignments, and for tests. If you have a different calculator that you'd like to use for the class, contact the instructor to find out whether your calculator is appropriate.

The final grade in the course will be based on quizzes, tests, and a comprehensive final exam. Mathematical-reasoning intensive.

MATH 210 Fundamentals of Analysis
(4 credits)
Parker, Adam

Prerequisite: MATH 202
Functions, set theory, sequences, the topology of the real line, and methods of mathematical proof. Particular emphasis is given to careful, accurate definition and proof of mathematical concepts. Grades may be based on several tests, quizzes, homework assignments, and a final examination.

WRITING INTENSIVE. Mathematical-reasoning intensive.

MATH 212 Multivariable Calculus
(4 credits)
Stickney, Alan

Prerequisite: MATH 202
This course completes the basic calculus sequence. It covers the calculus of functions of several variables and associated analytic geometry. Students are required to have a TI-83, TI-84, or TI-86 graphing calculator for use in class, for homework assignments, and for tests. The final grade in the course is based on quizzes, tests, and a comprehensive final exam. Mathematical-reasoning intensive.

MATH 260 Computational Models and Methods
(5 credits)
Stahlberg, Eric

Prerequisites: MATH 131 or MATH 201 and COMP 150 or equivalent with permission of the instructor
Introduction to the principles and approaches of using computational science through the use of problem solving methodologies. This includes the understanding, development, and use of mathematical models as well as their effective computer implementation. Approximately fifteen approaches across eight categories (continuous and discrete, static and dynamic, empirical and formulated) will be investigated. These models are adapted from a variety of scientific and real-world scenarios. Simulation and optimization techniques will also be discussed and used. Each student will undertake a realistic modeling project as part of the course. Laboratory required. This course is cross-listed as COMP 260. Students may enroll in either COMP 260 or MATH 260, but not both. Mathematical-reasoning intensive.

MATH 271 Discrete Mathematical Structures
(4 credits)
Bogaerts, Steven

Prerequisite: MATH 131 or MATH 201
Discrete Mathematical Structures covers a number of mathematical topics which are central to both mathematics and computer science, topics centering on the mathematics of discrete sets, that is, sets which are finite or at most countably infinite. Starting on the foundation of logic, set theory and basic proof techniques the course will cover relations and functions, counting arguments, discrete probability, number theory and graph theory. The course is required for the major and minor in computer science and can be used as an elective for the mathematics major. The course grade will be determined by quizzes, graded homework assignments, in-class tests and a comprehensive final.

MATH 327 Statistical Modeling
(4 credits)
Andrews, Douglas

Prerequisite: MATH 227 (or permission of instructor)
In this second course in statistics, regression analysis is the main vehicle for illustrating the principles of statistical modeling in real-world contexts. After a brief review of techniques and principles of Exploratory Data Analysis, students learn strategies for selecting and constructing models, criteria for assessing and comparing models, and tools for making formal inferences using these models. Class sessions include discussion of conceptual issues with practice in data analysis, and they put strong emphasis on interpreting and communicating the results of analyses. Students carry out projects in which they design studies, collect and analyze data, and present their findings. WRITING INTENSIVE. Mathematical-reasoning intensive.

MATH 365 Abstract Algebra
(4 credits)
Stickney, Alan

Prerequisite: MATH 205 and MATH 210
This course will focus on abstract algebraic structures such as groups, rings, and fields with particular attention to groups. There will be an emphasis on presenting arguments with a full explanation of the reasoning. Grades will be based on written homework, work done in class, and exams. WRITING INTENSIVE. Mathematical-reasoning intensive.

MATH 380 Introduction to Number Theory with Applications
(4 credits)
Stickney, Alan

Prerequisite: MATH 210 or permission of instructor
This course will focus on the study of the integers and their properties. Topics covered will include divisibility, the Euclidean algorithm, prime numbers, perfect numbers, congruences, and arithmetic modulo n. Applications will include topics from cryptography and the solution of integer equations.
Students will be expected to learn definitions and write proofs in addition to learning some of the computational aspects of number theory.

The final grade in the course will be based on homework, quizzes, tests, and a comprehensive final exam. Mathematical-reasoning intensive.

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