Myes Hall

Course Descriptions

Foreign Languages and Literatures Course Listings - Fall 2010

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum: CLAC
In the fall, you can take advantage of your language skills and use your knowledge of a foreign language to enhance your learning in one of the following disciplines: English, History, Philosophy, Political Science, or Psychology. In select courses, you can register for a CLAC module (Chin 230, Fren 230, Germ 230, Japn 230, Russ 230, or Span 230) that will allow you to earn one additional credit and certify that you have conducted research in a foreign language.

Prerequisite: You must either be enrolled in at least one two-credit 200-level course in the language or have completed at least one two-credit 200-level course in the language. The CLAC modules are designed for students with an intermediate background.

These courses offer a foreign language component or CLAC component in the following languages:

History 203, The Great War. Options available in Chinese, French, German, or Russian;
English 290, American Literary Traditions. Options available in Spanish, German;
Political Science 259, Topics in International Relations: International Political Economy. Options available in Chinese, French, German, or Russian;
Political Science 210, East Asian Politics, Options available in Chinese or Japanese;
Philosophy 204, Philosophy of Women’s Lives. Options available in French, German or Spanish;
Psychology 280, Psychology and Culture. Options available in Chinese, French, German, Japanese, Russian or Spanish.

Students who select the CLAC option will complete work in a foreign language that will supplement the work in other departments. Students who complete the CLAC assignments successfully will earn 1 credit for the CLAC component.

To register for the CLAC component, you must also register for one of the courses listed above and for one of the one-credit LANG 230 CLAC options listed for that course. Meeting times and location will be arranged at the beginning of the semester. Credit for CLAC modules may be counted toward the requirements for International Studies and as elective credit in the Language department.

Chinese 111/01/02: Beginning Chinese I
(5 semester hours)
S. Chan

Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.
Chinese is a fascinating language. It does not have Western style grammatical features such as tense, gender, number, agreement, etc. Instead, grammatical values are defined by markers and position, with the result that where elements are in sentences determines meaning. Chinese has a relatively simple phonetic structure and uses tones (voice pitches) to differentiate between words. The character writing system operates on the basis of representing concepts and sounds in a way that is fundamentally different from English alphabetic writing. These differences make Chinese an entrancing language and a window on a very different way of talking and thinking about the world. This year we will continue to use a textbook that concentrates on communicating in Chinese. Mastering the dialogues and conversations it contains will give you the ability to interact with Chinese people on topics from everyday life. We will also begin our study of the specifics of the Chinese writing system, and over the semester you will learn to read and write 250 characters and compounds.

Chinese 151A/C: Film and Fiction in Modern China
(4 semester hours)
S. Chan


Taught in English. No prerequisite.

We will watch and discuss representative films from the major waves of movie making in China, and we will read representative fiction from the four main literary periods in 20th century China; in two cases, the readings will be the original stories used to make the movies. We will focus on both the aesthetics of the short stories and movies as well as the cultural values they express. All readings, discussions, and lectures will be in English, and the films will have English subtitles. The Chinese have written magnificent stories and made great films so it will be an interesting and entertaining course. The course can be used to meet either the “A” or “C” General Education requirements.

Chinese 211: Intermediate Chinese I
(5 semester hours)
H. Choy

Prerequisite: Chinese 112 or the equivalent
Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.
We will focus on continuing to build both your reading and speaking abilities in modern Chinese. There will be an emphasis on reviewing the grammar we previously studied and mastering additional structures. We will, of course, be learning new vocabulary and developing greater skill with the writing system of the language. There will be many different activities aimed at improving both your speaking, listening, and reading skills in Chinese.

Chinese 230: CLAC Module. See description of Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum Above.
(1 semester hour)
H. Choy.

Prerequisite: Must either be enrolled in a 200-Level Chinese course or have completed at least 2 credits at the 200-Level

Chinese 230A/C: History in Fiction
(4 semester hours)
H. Choy

Taught in English. No prerequisites.
This course is an introduction to modern Chinese fiction of history, aiming at providing students with fundamental knowledge to understand twentieth-century Chinese history and appreciate contemporary Chinese literature.

Chinese 241: Foreign Language Tutor Training
(2 semester hours)
B. Bertrand

Permission of Instructor Only
This two-credit, half semester course is designed to train potential foreign language tutors for employment in Wittenberg’s Foreign Language Learning Center (FLLC). Learning goals include effective tutoring strategies, training in language technologies, and course-specific sessions with language faculty. The course will be taught in English by the FLLC director and will combine both practical and theoretical material in the form of readings, video segments, discussion, and hands-on practice. Students who complete the course will receive a certificate from the CRLA stating that they are certified level 2 (Advanced) tutors.
This course is mandatory for employment in the FLLC.

Chinese 311: Directed Readings in Chinese Newspapers
(4 credits)
H. Choy

Prerequisite: Chinese 212
This is a third year course in advanced Chinese. It aims at developing competence in the language with an emphasis on strategies and tactics of reading Chinese newspapers to enable students to acquaint themselves with recent developments in China. To accommodate the rapid changes in Chinese life and language today, we will supplement each lesson of the textbook with authentic news articles from the Internet. Students should expect a steady expansion of their vocabulary and speak the language in all classroom activities.

Chinese 380: Methods for Teaching Foreign Language (K-12)
(4 credits)
R. Hoff

Prerequisite: Eight semester hours at the 200 level in the target language
Course to acquire an understanding of the history and rationale for foreign language instruction and of the relationship between theories of language and learning and classroom practice. The students learn to plan, implement, and evaluate language instruction for students at the middle and secondary school levels, and to enrich curriculum content to promote appreciation of the customs, values, and history of other cultures. Field experience is included.

Chinese 490: Independent Study
Tutorials for the student who has excelled in previous study of Chinese. Thematic content chosen according to student's intellectual interests. Conducted in spoken putonghua.

French 111: Beginning French I
(5 semester hours)
T. Wilkerson

Open to the beginner, except by permission or placement. Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.
Fundamentals of grammar, pronunciation, oral practice and laboratory work. Also a basic introduction to French culture.

French 112F/01: Beginning French II
(5 semester hours)
A. Kazez

Prerequisite: French 111 or placement. Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.
Grammar review, composition, oral practice, reading, and required laboratory.

French 112F/02: Beginning French II
(5 semester hours)
T. Wilkerson

Prerequisite: French 111 or placement. Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.
Grammar review, composition, oral practice, reading, and required laboratory.

French 150F: Intermediate French
(5 semester hours)
L. Wierenga

Prerequisite: French 112 or placement. Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.
Study of French in the context of the liberal arts. Readings in French literature, culture, and history; composition, oral practice; thorough and systematic review of French grammar.

French 230: CLAC Module. See description of Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum Above.
(1 semester hour)
T. Wilkerson


Prerequisite: Must either be enrolled in a 200-Level French course or have completed at least 2 credits at the 200-Level.

French 241: Foreign Language Tutor Training
(2 semester hours)
B. Bertrand

Permission of Instructor Only
This two-credit, half semester course is designed to train potential foreign language tutors for employment in Wittenberg’s Foreign Language Learning Center (FLLC). Learning goals include effective tutoring strategies, training in language technologies, and course-specific sessions with language faculty. The course will be taught in English by the FLLC director and will combine both practical and theoretical material in the form of readings, video segments, discussion, and hands-on practice. Students who complete the course will receive a certificate from the CRLA stating that they are certified level 2 (Advanced) tutors. This course is mandatory for employment in the FLLC.

French 264/1.2: Moments de L’histoire francophone (Highlights of francophone history)
(2 semester hours)
L. Wierenga

Prerequisite: Successful completion of French 112 or placement
This is a content-based course that offers a general overview of French history from the Roman conquest to the Fifth Republic and the end of the colonial empire. Taught in French.

French 265/1.1: Qui sont les Français? L’Identité nationale (Who are the French ? National Identity)
(2 semester hours)
L. Wierenga

Prerequisite: Successful completion of French 112 or placement
Consideration of topics in contemporary French culture, including study of comparative cultures, national identity and educational institutions today. Taught in French.

French 303/1W: Panorama de la littérature française
(4 semester hours)
L. Wierenga

Prerequisite: Four French semester hours at the 200 level
Survey of major writers in French literature from the medieval period through the 21th century. Taught in French. Writing intensive.

French 305: Traduction et stylistique
(4 semester hours)
T. Wilkerson

Prerequisite: Four French semester hours at the 200 level
This course focuses on translation as a mechanism for examining principles of grammar and style in French and English.

French 380: Methods for Teaching Foreign Language (K-12)
(4 credits)
R. Hoff

Prerequisite: Eight semester hours at the 200 level in the target language
Course to acquire an understanding of the history and rationale for foreign language instruction and of the relationship between theories of language and learning and classroom practice. The students learn to plan, implement, and evaluate language instruction for students at the middle and secondary school levels, and to enrich curriculum content to promote appreciation of the customs, values, and history of other cultures. Field experience is included.

French 490: Independent Study

French 491: Internship

German 111/01: Beginning German I
(5 semester hours)
D. Barry

Open to only the beginner, except by permission of instructor. Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.
Fundamentals of grammar, pronunciation, oral practice, and laboratory work. Also a basic introduction to German culture.

German 111/02: Beginning German I
(5 semester hours)
T. Bennett

Open to only the beginner, except by permission of instructor. Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.
Fundamentals of grammar, pronunciation, oral practice, and laboratory work. Also a basic introduction to German culture.

German 112F: Beginning German II
(5 semester hours)
D. Barry

Prerequisite: German 111 or equivalent. Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.
Explication of grammar, continued oral practice, reading of literary and/or cultural texts, and related explication of grammar and laboratory work.

German 230: CLAC Module. See description of Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum Above.
(1 semester hour)
D. Barry/ T. Bennett

Prerequisite: Must either be enrolled in a 200-Level German course or have completed at least 2 credits at the 200-Level

German 241: Foreign Language Tutor Training
(2 credits)
B. Bertrand

Permission of Instructor Only
This two-credit, half semester course is designed to train potential foreign language tutors for employment in Wittenberg’s Foreign Language Learning Center (FLLC). Learning goals include effective tutoring strategies, training in language technologies, and course-specific sessions with language faculty. The course will be taught in English by the FLLC director and will combine both practical and theoretical material in the form of readings, video segments, discussion, and hands-on practice. Students who complete the course will receive a certificate from the CRLA stating that they are certified level 2 (Advanced) tutors. This course is mandatory for employment in the FLLC.

German 264/1.1: Deutsche Geschichte und historische Quellen (German History and Historical Sources)
(2 semester hours)
T. Bennett

Prerequisite: Successful completion of German 112 or German 200 level placement
Through the study of German, students will read and discuss texts and films that narrate German history and become conversant with major historical events in German-speaking Europe. The course will also help students work on language skills necessary for narrating past events.

German 265/1.2: Nationale Identität und kulturelle Vielfalt (National Identity and Cultural Diversity)
(2 semester hours)
T. Bennett

Prerequisite: Successful completion of German 112 or German 200 level placement
Through readings, film, and discussion, students study the histories that have shaped German identity in the twentieth and twenty-first century and which shape contemporary discussions of pluralism in German-speaking Europe. The course also focuses on developing the language skills necessary to engage in basic research and discussion of these issues.

German 330: „Bunte Republik Deutschland“
(4 semester hours)
D. Barry

Prerequisite: Eight semester hours in German at the 200 level

According to a census of 2005, fifteen million of Germany’s eight-two million inhabitants are either themselves immigrants or the children or grandchildren of immigrants. Although the country continues to resist the official designation, Germany has indeed become an “Einwanderungsland”—a “bunte Republik.” With reference to a variety of literary and socio-historical texts as well as to a small number of films, this course explores the influence of ethnic, cultural and linguistic minorities on our image of contemporary Germany.

German 380: Methods for Teaching Foreign Language (K-12)
(4 credits)
R. Hoff

Prerequisite: Eight semester hours at the 200 level in the target language
Course to acquire an understanding of the history and rationale for foreign language instruction and of the relationship between theories of language and learning and classroom practice. The students learn to plan, implement, and evaluate language instruction for students at the middle and secondary school levels, and to enrich curriculum content to promote appreciation of the customs, values, and history of other cultures. Field experience is included.

German 490: Independent Study

German 491: Internship


Japanese 111/01/02: Beginning Japanese I
(5 semester hours)
T. Imai

Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.
Introduces the fundamental communication skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, as well as the sociolinguistic information necessary for effective communication with Japanese natives.

Japanese 211: Intermediate Japanese I
(4 semester hours)
M. Hoye

Prerequisite: Japanese 112 with a C- or higher or placement.
Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.
Further development of the fundamental communication skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, as well as the sociolinguistic information necessary for effective communication with Japanese natives.

Japanese 230: CLAC Module. See description of Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum Above.
(1 semester hour)
T. Imai

Prerequisite: Must either be enrolled in a 200-Level Japanese course or have completed at least 2 credits at the 200-Level

Japanese 230: Japanese Linguistics
(4 semester hours)
M. Hoye

This class is open to students of sophomore standing or higher. Taught in English. No prerequisites.
The primary goal is to introduce students to some important aspects of the Japanese language in order to deepen an understanding of how language works by examining a language that is very different from English. Comparisons between English and Japanese and a review of basic linguistic concepts will also be included.

Japanese 241: Foreign Language Tutor Training
(2 semester hours)
B. Bertrand

Permission of Instructor Only
This two-credit, half semester course is designed to train potential foreign language tutors for employment in Wittenberg’s Foreign Language Learning Center (FLLC). Learning goals include effective tutoring strategies, training in language technologies, and course-specific sessions with language faculty. The course will be taught in English by the FLLC director and will combine both practical and theoretical material in the form of readings video segments, discussion, and hands-on practice. Students who complete the course will receive a certificate from the CRLA stating that they are certified level 2 (Advanced) tutors. This course is mandatory for employment in the FLLC.

Japanese 311: Advanced Japanese I
(4 semester hours)
M. Hoye

Prerequisite: Japanese 212 with a C- or higher or placement
The goal of the course is to develop culturally and socially appropriate proficiency in the four language skills: reading, writing, listening, and speaking.

Japanese 380: Methods for Teaching Foreign Language (K-12)
(4 credits)
R. Hoff

Prerequisite: Eight semester hours at the 200 level in the target language
Course to acquire an understanding of the history and rationale for foreign language instruction and of the relationship between theories of language and learning and classroom practice. The students learn to plan, implement, and evaluate language instruction for students at the middle and secondary school levels, and to enrich curriculum content to promote appreciation of the customs, values, and history of other cultures. Field experience is included.

Japanese 430: Topics in Japanese Language and Literature
(4 semester hours)
T. Imai

Prerequisite: Japanese 312
This course is designed to meet the needs of Japanese language students who have surpassed the highest levels of Japanese language study available in existing courses at the university. Course design will vary in accordance with student need, and may include select readings and conversation activities.

Japanese 490: Independent Study

Latin 111: Intermediate Latin
(4 semester hours)
Staff

Concentration of grammar, exercises and selected readings. Intended for the beginner and for the student with some high school background in Latin.

Russian 111: Beginning Russian I
(5 semester hours)
L. Zaharkov

Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.
Afraid of the Russian alphabet? Believe it or not, you already know almost half of it if you know Latin (our) alphabet and a little Greek from being a member of a sorority or a fraternity! After just five days you will be able to read many words that are borrowed from other languages! We use the computer to help us, too! Recent world economic events have convinced us that Russia is indeed an important player in the international economic arena. Don’t be left behind! This course also will teach you how to speak and write Russian while learning the structure of the language. In addition, this course is accompanied by a video program where we follow the adventures of an American who lands in Russia as a roving photographer to
learn about the people and the country.

Russian 230: CLAC Module. See description of Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum Above.
(1 semester hour)
L. Zaharkov

Prerequisite: Must either be enrolled in a 200-Level Russian course or have completed at least 2 credits at the 200-Level

Russian 241: Foreign Language Tutor Training
(2 semester hours)
B. Bertrand

Permission of instructor only
This two-credit, half semester course is designed to train potential foreign language tutors for employment in Wittenberg’s Foreign Language Learning Center (FLLC). Learning goals include effective tutoring strategies, training in language technologies, and course-specific sessions with language faculty. The course will be taught in English by the FLLC director and will combine both practical and theoretical material in the form of readings, video segments, discussion, and hands-on practice. Students who complete the course will receive a certificate from the CRLA stating that they are certified level 2 (Advanced) tutors. This course is mandatory for employment in the FLLC.

Russian 260/1.2: Understanding Contemporary Russian Social Issues
(2 semester hours)
L. Zaharkov

Prerequisite: Russian 112 or placement at the 200 level
Introduction to reading skills in Russian by using authentic materials from the contemporary Russian press found on the World Wide Web. Discussion of social and cultural issues in Russian society such as the role of women, education, political movements and youth groups, immigration and relocation issues of the former Soviet Republics.

Russian 263/1.1: Russian Film and Culture
(2 semester hours)
L. Zaharkov

Prerequisite: Russian 112 or placement at the 200 level
Through the study of Russian, students will watch and discuss films that acquaint students with contemporary Russian life. Students will learn the vocabulary necessary to discuss the portrayals of family, relationships, changing value systems, and social questions as reflected in Russian film. This course will also help students gain additional language skills in speaking and aural comprehension.

Russian 380: Methods for Teaching Foreign Language (K-12)
(4 credits)
R. Hoff

Prerequisite: Eight semester hours at the 200 level in the target language
Course to acquire an understanding of the history and rationale for foreign language instruction and of the relationship between theories of language and learning and classroom practice. The students learn to plan, implement, and evaluate language instruction for students at the middle and secondary school levels, and to enrich curriculum content to promote appreciation of the customs, values, and history of other cultures. Field experience is included.

Russian 490: Independent Study

Spanish 101/1.1: Spanish for High Beginners
(2 semester hours)
R. Hoff

Students will have a Workshop or 101 placement, or permission of Spanish faculty.
Designed for students who have had two years or less of previous instruction in Spanish but who are not yet ready to enter a 112 class. Course will review essential structures needed to prepare students for 112 classes, focusing upon the communicative structures of reading, writing, listening, and speaking.

Spanish 111: Beginning Spanish I
(5 semester hours)
J. Cantrell

Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.
Emphasis on elementary grammar, and oral practice.

Spanish 112F/01/02: Beginning Spanish II
(5 semester hours)
S. Henlon

Prerequisite: Spanish 111 or placement. Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.
A continuation of Spanish 111, this course includes grammar, composition, oral practice, and reading.

Spanish 112F/03: Beginning Spanish II
(5 semester hours)
J. Cantrell

Prerequisite: Spanish 111 or placement. Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.
A continuation of Spanish 111, this course includes grammar, composition, oral practice, and reading.

Spanish 150F/01: Intermediate Spanish
(5 semester hours)
R. Hoff

Prerequisite: Spanish 112 or placement. Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.
This is an intermediate level course that will review, introduce, and expand upon vocabulary and structures commonly dealt with in introductory courses.

Spanish 150F/02: Intermediate Spanish
(5 semester hours)
F. Blanco

Prerequisite: Spanish 112 or placement. Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.
This is an intermediate level course that will review, introduce, and expand upon vocabulary and structures commonly dealt with in introductory courses. It includes a Service Learning optional component. The Service Learning option provides a hands-on learning experience through real life exchanges with native Spanish speakers.

Spanish 230: CLAC Module. See description of Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum Above.
(1 semester hour)
R. Hoff/ C. McIntyre

Prerequisite: Must either be enrolled in a 200-Level Spanish course or have completed at least 2 credits at the 200-Level

Spanish 241: Foreign Language Tutor Training
(2 semester hours)
B. Bertrand

Permission of instructor only
This two-credit, half semester course is designed to train potential foreign language tutors for employment in Wittenberg’s Foreign Language Learning Center (FLLC). Learning goals include effective tutoring strategies, training in language technologies, and course-specific sessions with language faculty. The course will be taught in English by the FLLC director and will combine both practical and theoretical material in the form of readings, video segments, discussion, and hands-on practice. Students who complete the course will receive a certificate from the CRLA stating that they are certified level 2 (Advanced) tutors. This course is mandatory for employment in the FLLC.

Spanish 260/1.1: El mundo contemporáneo (Contemporary Issues of the Hispanic World)
(2 semester hours)
F. Blanco

Prerequisite: Spanish 112, or Spanish 150, or placement at the 200 level.
This course focuses on contemporary issues of the Hispanic world including topics such as immigration, politics, pop culture, economics, demography, religion, social class, and globalization. The course will help students develop conversational skills and strategies.

Spanish 261/1.1: El mundo físico (The Physical World)
(2 semester hours)
C. McIntyre

Prerequisite: Spanish 112, or Spanish 150, or placement at the 200 level.
This course serves as an introduction to the Hispanic world by highlighting the diverse nature and cultures of Spanish-speaking people focusing on speech patterns, climate, geography and environmental issues. The course will also develop language skills that will enhance students’ ability to express themselves in Spanish.

Spanish 262/1.2: Entre dos mundos: el arte de la traducción (Between Two Worlds: The Art of Translation)
(2 semester hours)
C. McIntyre

Prerequisite: Spanish 112, 150, or 200 level placement
This intermediate course will introduce students to the theory (theories) and practices of translation. Through translation practice from Spanish to English, and English to Spanish, students will focus on nuance, style and context of language/text. Students will read selected essays on translation, read selected texts in dual language versions, and create their own translations of short texts.

Spanish 263/1.2: El cine y el cambio social (Film and Social Change)
(2 semester hours)
F. Blanco

Prerequisite: Spanish 112, 150 or 200 level placement
This course introduces students to film from Spain and Latin America that intersect with social and historical transitions. Students will explore the cultural context of each film, analyze major themes, and discuss the role of film as a reflection of and catalyst for social change. The course will focus on aiding students in developing language skills for description and reporting.

Spanish 264/1.1W: Voces del pasado (Voices of the Past)
(2 semester hours)
S. Henlon

Prerequisite: Four semester hours of 200 level courses in Spanish
This course gives students an opportunity to gain an understanding of the Spanish-speaking world by examining its rich cultural heritage. Through reading and writing activities, student learners will explore the complexity of the Hispanic world and how historical events have influenced human conduct. The course will help students develop language skills for description and narration in the past. Writing intensive.

Spanish 265/1.2W: La diversidad en el mundo hispano (Diversity in the Spanish-speaking World)
(2 semester hours)
S. Henlon

Prerequisite: Four semester hours of 200 level courses in Spanish
This intermediate course will provide students the opportunity to explore human diversity in the Spanish-speaking world, in both historical and contemporary contexts. Through reading, viewing and writing activities students will gain an understanding of the complexities of identity, ethnicity and multiculturalism across the Hispanic world, including the United States. The course will aid students in developing language skills to express and support opinion. Writing intensive.

Spanish 350H: Spanish Peninsular Civilization
(4 semester hours)
C. McIntyre

Prerequisite: Eight semester hours at the 200 level including Spanish 264 and 265
Cultural survey of Spain from its earliest history to the present with an emphasis on contemporary Peninsular culture. Lectures and discussions are supplemented by readings as well as presentations that reflect the history and development of Spanish civilization.

Spanish 380: Methods for Teaching Foreign Language (K-12)
(4 credits)
R. Hoff

Prerequisite: Eight semester hours at the 200 level in the target language
Course to acquire an understanding of the history and rationale for foreign language instruction and of the relationship between theories of language and learning and classroom practice. The students learn to plan, implement, and evaluate language instruction for students at the middle and secondary school levels, and to enrich curriculum content to promote appreciation of the customs, values, and history of other cultures. Field experience is included.

Spanish 415/: Advanced Studies in Spanish Language
(4 semester hours)
F. Blanco

Prerequisite: Eight semester hours in Spanish at the 200 level and one 300 level Spanish
It is especially recommended for students who seek advanced work in grammar, with the goal of producing idiomatic Spanish. Students will acquire an understanding of more sophisticated grammar structures and their interrelations. The aim of this course is not the simple exercise of elementary writing skills but the development and improvement of students’ capacity to write in Spanish in a formal way. A secondary aim of the course is to improve the students’ familiarity with the formal spoken language.

Spanish 494: Methodology of Early Childhood Spanish Language Education
(2 semester hours)
R. Hoff

Prerequisite: Eight semester hours in Spanish at the 200 level
This course is designed to give students seeking the P-12 licensure in Spanish experience in foreign language teaching at the elementary school level. The course requires a six-week field experience of observation and supervised teaching of Spanish in one of the local elementary schools.

Spanish 490: Independent Study

Spanish 491: Internship











































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