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Past Course Descriptions

Course Listings - Spring 2010

DEPARTMENT OF EAST ASIAN STUDIES

East Asian Studies
Course Descriptions
Spring 2010

Chinese 112F:  Elementary Chinese II
(5 credits)
Chan, Shelley

Prerequisite:  Chinese 111 or placement.
Continuation of 111.  Gaining further skill in using putonghua with every day conversational topics will be important.  We will also learn to read and write more of the characters used to represent those concepts. Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.

Chinese 130A/C:  Introduction to Chinese Culture
(4 credits)
Choy, Howard

Taught in English.  No prerequisites.
This course is an introduction to Chinese culture from ancient to modern times aiming at providing students with fundamental knowledge of this Asian civilization.  We will first study China in the pre-modern period, and then proceed to focus on its modern developments.  Students will learn aspects of Chinese history, literature, art, philosophy, and religion by reading primary sources in English translation.

Chinese 212:  Intermediate Chinese II
(5 credits)
Choy, Howard

Prerequisite:  Chinese 211 or placement
This is the second part of a two-semester course in intermediate Chinese.  Students will continue to develop the basic language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in daily life situations and self-expressions.  It is intended to lay a solid foundation for everyday communication in Chinese and further study of the language.  Students should be prepared for a steady expansion of their vocabulary and are expected to speak the language in classroom activities.  Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.

 CHIN 330C. Chinese Topics: Business Chinese
(4 Credits)
Choy, Howard

Prerequisite: Chinese 311 or its equivalent.
This is an advanced Chinese language course with specific attention to business terminology and etiquette. Students will have improved oral communication skills in business settings and acquired business protocols and decorum strategies through reading and writing of survey, commercial, etc. Taught in Chinese; readings in Chinese.  Writing Intensive.

Chinese 330 – 1W:  Chinese Topics:  May 4th to June 4th:  Lu Xun and Mo Yan
(4 credits)
Chan, Shelley

Taught in English.  No prerequisites.
This course focuses on two writers, Lu Xun (1881-1936), the father of modern Chinese literature who exemplified the liberal spirits of the May Fourth literature, and Mo Yan (1955-), one of the most influential and prolific writers of contemporary China.  Using the May Fourth Movement of 1919 and the June Fourth Tiananmen Massacre of 1989 as milestones, this course analyzes the writings by these two important writers, which showcase the historical and cultural contexts of China in the past century.  We will examine how the May Fourth literary tradition is continued and developed by contemporary writers represented by Mo Yan.  Other May Fourth writers, as well as the contemporaries of Mo Yan, will also be introduced.  Film will be used to provide a visual dimension to the stories in question.  Students will be introduced to the important scholarship of Lu Xun studies.  All readings are in English and all films have English subtitles.  Writing intensive.

Econ 290C/L:  The Economy of China
Writing-intensive
(4 credits)
Frost, Marcia

This course is designed to introduce China's economy, the fastest growing and soon to become the second largest in the world, and the innumerable challenges it faces of both economic transition from command to free markets and economic development.  Topics will include the historical evolution of the economy during the 20th & 21st centuries, the rural-urban and provincial divides between the have and have-nots, patterns of growth and development in the countryside and cities, living standards and human capital, international trade and foreign investment, environment and sustainable growth.  Writing intensive.  A CLAC option is available; see Foreign Languages for more information.

EAS 400 Senior Seminar
(4 Semester Hours)
Oldstone-Moore, Jennifer

Pre-requisite: EAS Senior Majors

Capstone course in which the senior East Asian Studies major integrates the major strands of East Asian history and society around a specific theme and writes an extensive research paper.  Every year.  Writing intensive. 

GEOG 250C  China’s Geography
3 Credits                                          
 Ralph Lenz

Pre-requisites:  None
Despite many parallels between China’s physical environment and that of the USA, there are some notable contrasts.  With a geographic area extending from deserts of Central Asia to the Pacific Ocean, environmental diversity within the region is pronounced.  This regional course will examine environmental impacts on cultural and economic patterns.  China offers a surprising amount of cultural diversity, and cultural and economic contrasts between the Han and various minority populations, a topic not covered in most East Asian Studies classes, will be emphasized.  As China undergoes a tremendous economic transition, huge disparities between the interior of the country and its coast have resulted.  Demographic, agricultural, and urban patterns will be examined.  Evaluation will be based on exams and quizzes, a project, and an oral presentation about one of China’s subregions or minority groups.

If you have already taken East Asia Geography, do not sign up for this class, as it mostly covers the China section of last Spring’s East Asia Geography team-taught class.

Hist 201 C: Japan’s Medieval Past
4 Credits
Maus, Tanya

Prerequisites:  None
Japan’s Medieval Past is most often viewed through the rise of a ruling warrior (samurai) class. However, long before the age of the samurai, civil officials, aristocratic women, monks, and wandering performers created an unprecedented age of political, social, artistic and literary achievement that drew on rich and diverse traditions from within and without Japan. Through the use of primary historical sources, literature, and classic film by directors such as Akira Kurosawa and Mizoguchi Kenji,  this course will examine Japan’s complex medieval heritage beginning with the rise of a stable imperial rule in the sixth century and ending with the anarchy of the warring states period of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries.  Students will be evaluated according to quizzes, two exams, weekly journal responses, and an analytical paper of five to six pages. This course is writing intensive and may be taken for a C credit.

History 202C Hiroshima’s Shadow
4 Credits
Maus, Tanya

This course explores how historians write and interpret history by examining the historical debates and historical memory of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in Japan from 1945 to the present. We will consider how the understanding of the atomic bombings and the reasons for the bombings have changed over time in Japanese public discourse by focusing on primary and secondary sources written by Japanese scientists, artists, and literary figures from 1945 to the present. The understanding of Japanese atomic bomb discourse will be deepened by also pursuing the changing historical memory of the atomic bombings in the United States, since the national narratives of the atomic bombing in the US and Japan are deeply intertwined. This course will engage students in the study of the diverse perspectives within Japan regarding the atomic bombing. In particular, the course will look at differing atomic bomb narratives (for example, those of Korean victims of the bombing and current cancer victims that continue trace their illness to the atomic bombings) in Japan that have been often excluded from public memory and that struggle to survive in the face of erasure from the political center. Students’ work will be evaluated through in-class participation, in-class quizzes, presentations and a variety of written assignments. This course is Writing Intensive and may be taken for a C credit.  A CLAC option is available for this course in Japanese or Chinese; see Foreign Languages for more information.

Hist 390:  From Edo to Tokyo: Revolutionary Change in Japan
4 Credits
Maus, Tanya

Prerequisite:  HIST 202C/H or permission of instructor.
In 1868 impoverished, disheveled samurai and angry rioting commoners in the heavily populated capital city of Edo brought the early modern Japanese military regime to an end. As a result, Edo was renamed Tokyo and the emergence of this vast modern metropolis reflected a radically new social and political order in Japan. This course will examine how historians have interpreted the events of 1868 and the transition from Edo to Tokyo in efforts to understand the role of modern Japan within the world’s modern history. As a class, we will analyze and discuss political, social, cultural historical interpretations of Japan’s revolutionary transformation as a way to understand the ways in which historians are informed by the ideological views of their present and to understand how history itself changes over time. The class will have a heavy reading load focused on the revolution and historiography, and grading will be largely on analytical papers, oral presentation, and focused discussion. This course is writing intensive.

JAPN 112F. Beginning Japanese II
5 credits
Imai, Terumi

Prerequisite: Japanese III or placement
Continued introduction of fundamental listening, speaking, reading and writing skills, together with the relevant sociolinguistic information.  Every year.

JAPN 130: Japanese Topics
4 credits
Hoye

Topics, chosen by the instructor, designed to be of interest to the entire campus community. Taught in English, readings in English. Some sections writing intensive. Offered as need arises. This course may be repeated for credit.

JAPN 212: Intermediate Japanese II
5 credits
Hoye

Prerequisite: Japanese 211 or placement.
Continued development of the fundamental communication skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing, as well as the sociolinguistic information necessary for effective communication with Japanese natives.90 minutes of independent work in the Foreign Language Learning Center required.  Every year.

JAPN 312: Advanced Japanese II
4 credits
Hoye

Prerequisite: 311 or placement.
A continuation of 311, the goal of the course is to develop culturally and socially appropriate proficiency in the four language skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking. Every year.

JAPN 430: Topics in Japanese Language and Literature
4 credits
Imai, Terumi

Prerequisite: Japanese 312 or permission of the instructor.
This course is designed to meet the needs of Japanese language students who have surpassed the highest levels of Japanese language study available in existing courses at the university.  Course design will vary in accordance with student need, and may include select readings and conversation activities. 

RELI 134 R/C:  Japanese and Chinese Religious Traditions
(4 semester hours)
Oldstone-Moore, Jennifer

Pre-requisite:  None
This course examines several religious traditions which have shaped East Asian civilizations.  We will study the formal traditions of Taoism, Confucianism, Buddhism, and Shinto; we will also consider the popular religious traditions of China and Japan.  Classes include both lecture and discussion; students will be evaluated through essay exams, short papers and analysis of scripture and other texts.

RELI 335 C/R: 1W Confucianism and Its Critics
(4 semester hours)
Oldstone-Moore, Jennifer
 
Seminar on the history, central teachings, and institutions of the East Asian Confucian and Neo-Confucian traditions and Confucianism as manifest in the modern world.  We will read pivotal works of Chinese, Japanese and Korean Confucians including the Analects, Mencius, the writings of Zhu Xi, Wang Yangming, Korean Neo-Confucians, Kaibera Ekken, and Tu Wei-ming.  These will be assessed in part in contrast to critics of Confucianism ranging from classical philosophers to Shinto revivalists to twentieth century Marxists.  Assessment includes short papers, essay exams, and a term paper.  Writing intensive.

THDN 13: Chinese TaiChi and TaiChi Sword
2 credits (1/2 semester)
Chang, Shih-Ming

It is a studio activity class.  Student will first learn the 24 short form TaiChi and then the Wudang TaiChi sword afterwards.  They will get one P credit after completion of the classes.

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