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Course Descriptions

International Studies Course Listings - Spring 2011

ECON 190S Principles of Economics
4 credits
Frost, Marcia; Tiffany, Frederick;  Wishart, David

Prerequisites:  Students must have attained the math placement level 22 to enroll
An introduction to basic principles of economics.  Topics covered include supply and demand, marginal analysis, competition, profit maximization, aggregate demand, and supply, the level of employment, inflation, fiscal policy, monetary policy, and international trade.  Lecture/discussion format.

GEOG 101S 01 Cultural Geography
4 credits
Scholl, Andrew

Pre-requisites:  None
The objective of this course is to introduce the student to the breadth of human geography and in particular how populations influence the way the environment is developed and utilized by people and the subsequent patterns present on the landscape.  Topics will include: the spatial organization of human activities, ways in which social processes and structures can be understood through a geographic lens, geographic perspectives of human/environment interactions, economic relationships, how States influence cultural survival, and the impact of globalization.  The course will follow a lecture/discussion format to enhance critical thinking and writing abilities.  The overall aim of the course is to provide the student with the analytical skills necessary to think critically about contemporary geographical patterns and processes while also cultivating the student’s own geographical imagination. 

HIST 106C/H 01. Modern World
4 credits
Oldstone-Moore, Christopher

Prerequisite:  none
This course is designed as an introduction to the larger themes and questions of world history from approximately 1400-present.  Rather than focusing on charting the dates and times of all the world’s events, we will examine political institutions, economic/demographic trends, and social organizations in order to better understand the world today.  Using a global framework, students will explore the development of modern civilizations in the Near and Far East, Eastern/Western Europe, Africa and the Americas. Assessment will focus on the students' ability to express their ideas in essay exams, quizzes, short papers, and oral presentations.  Writing Intensive.  (This course is required for the History/Integrated Social Studies Major.)

HIST 106C/H 1W. Modern World
4 credits
Proctor, Tammy

Prerequisite:  none
This course is designed as an introduction to the larger themes and questions of world history from approximately 1400-present.  Rather than focusing on charting the dates and times of all the world’s events, we will examine political institutions, economic/demographic trends, and social organizations in order to better understand the world today.  Using a global framework, students will explore the development of modern civilizations in the Near and Far East, Eastern/Western Europe, Africa and the Americas. Assessment will focus on the students' ability to express their ideas in essay exams, quizzes, short papers, and oral presentations.  Writing Intensive.  (This course is required for the History/Integrated Social Studies Major.)

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum:  CLAC
Interested in using your foreign language skills to earn extra credit connected to this course and to learn more about the subject matter of this course at the same time?  If so, register for the CLAC components offered here.  You don’t need to be fluent in the language to exercise this option.  In fact, you need only to have completed two credits beyond 112 or to be currently enrolled in a course beyond 112.  Your work will be guided by your professor and by faculty from the Languages Department.  The CLAC module is designed for intermediate level language learners.

This course offers a foreign language component or CLAC component in the following languages:  Russian, Japanese, Chinese, Spanish, French, German

Students who select the CLAC option will complete work in a foreign language that will supplement the work in this course.  Students who complete the CLAC assignments successfully will earn 1 credit for the CLAC component.

To register for the CLAC component, you must also register for a one-credit LANG 230 CLAC module listed among the Language Department’s offerings.  Meeting times and location will be arranged at the beginning of the semester.    Credit for CLAC modules may be counted toward the requirements for International Studies and as elective credit in the Language department.

HIST 325 1W Topics in Diplomacy: The Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan
4 credits
Wood, Molly

Prerequisites: HIST 106 or HIST 222 or permission of instructor.

In an increasingly interdependent world it is important to understand the historical forces responsible for creating the current international climate and the relationships between the U.S. and the rest of the world.  This seminar-style course will explore the origins and outcomes (so far) of the current U.S. wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.   Class sessions will mix some lecture with substantial discussion based on common readings (books, articles and documents).  Attendance is required.  Students will be evaluated on their participation in class, and the timely completion of all reading and writing assignments.  This course is writing intensive. 

INTL  300 At the Crossroad of Old and New Europe,
4 credits
Kolkmann  (Offered in Wittenberg Germany)

This course offers an introductory survey of the intersection between the historic place that is Germany and the contemporary socio-political scene in Old and New Europe. The course will consider the various “hot issues” that transcend national boundaries. Being on-site in Germany will provide an opportunity to study how these issues affect local culture and society. They would include, among others: European expansion and integration; the consequences of the accession of former Warsaw Pact member states into the European Union or, more generally, how the process of European integration has affected national political systems; the particular role of transitional economies and the ever increasing significance of religious and ethnic minorities; and, finally, the EU and its bilateral relationship with the United States. All readings are in English and successful completion of the course counts toward fulfillment of the S-learning goal.

INTL 495 – Senior Seminar – The U.S. and the World in the Twentieth Century
4 credits
McIntyre, Christine

Pre-Requisite:  Senior Standing or permission of instructor or Program Director

In The Buried Mirror, a book-length essay on Latin American identity, pre-eminent Mexican intellectual Carlos Fuentes asserts the following:
Our perception of the United States has been that of a democracy inside and an empire outside: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. We have admired democracy; we have deplored empire. And we have suffered the actions of this country, which has constantly intervened in our lives in the name of manifest destiny, the big stick, dollar diplomacy, and cultural arrogance [Fuentes, 325]. In this class we will examine Fuentes’ thesis, and extend it beyond Latin America, as we look at other places around the globe where the United States has intervened.  We will read critically: books, articles, films and the news. We will examine current events to help us understand the past. We will investigate the past in order to shed light on the present, and perhaps project into the future.

POLI 251S 01 International Relations
4 credits
Yu, Bin

This course begins with an overview of the evolution of international system. This is followed by the discussion of some key theoretical concepts and approaches in the study of international relations (IR).  Students will then apply IR history and theories to analyze some major issues in the 21st century, including international security, international political economy, nationalism, democratization, and global governance.  The course has a lecture/discussion format.  Students are encouraged to speak out in the discussion sections.  There will be a mid-term, a final exam, and a take home paper.

POLI 354 1W – Chinese Foreign Policy
4 credits
Yu, Bin

       
Prerequisite:  East Asian and Political Science majors desirable, or POLI 102S, 205C, or 210C/S, and Jr class standing

This course is designed to introduce the student to the evolution and workings of Chinese foreign policy. Emphasis will be on the PRC's foreign policy behavior, in terms of its historical patterns, the role of ideology, national interests, military and strategic factors, economics, domestic politics, and the decision-making structure and process. The course also analyzes the interplay of these factors in shaping Chinese policy toward certain countries and regions. The course is a seminar and students will be required to give a number of oral presentations based on the readings and one 15-page research paper.  WRITING INTENSIVE

 

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