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Course Descriptions

East Asian Studies Course Listings - Spring 2012

CHIN 112F Elementary Chinese II
4 credits
Fan, Zhewei

Prerequisite: Chinese 111 or placement.
Continuation of 111. Gaining further skill in using putonghua with every day conversational topics will be important. We will also learn to read and write more of the characters used to represent those concepts. Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.

CHIN 130A/C Introduction to Chinese Culture
4 credits
Fan, Zhewei
Choy, Howard

Taught in English. No prerequisites.
This course is an introduction to Chinese culture from ancient to modern times aiming at providing students with fundamental knowledge of this Asian civilization. We will first study China in the pre-modern period, and then proceed to focus on its modern developments. Students will learn aspects of Chinese history, literature, art, philosophy, and religion by reading primary sources in English translation.

CHIN 212 Intermediate Chinese II
4 credits
Choy, Howard

Prerequisite: Chinese 211 or placement
This is the second part of a two-semester course in intermediate Chinese. Students will continue to develop the basic language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in daily life situations and self-expressions. It is intended to lay a solid foundation for everyday communication in Chinese and further study of the language. Students should be prepared for a steady expansion of their vocabulary and are expected to speak the language in classroom activities. Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.

CHIN 312 Directed Readings in Chinese Literature
4 credits
Choy, Howard

Prerequisite: Chinese 311 or permission of instructor
This is an advanced Chinese course. Students will continue to develop reading strategies and writing skills. The opportunity to work with more lively, thought-provoking materials will be valuable for the interdisciplinary study of the language, literature, and culture. Students will read authentic literary writings published in the 1990s and 2000s. This course emphasizes different styles of writing and current thoughts on humanity with extensive discussion and frequent composition assignments in Chinese.

EAST 100 C Introduction to East Asia: Continuity and Change
4 credits
Moskowitz, Nora

What is the basis of cultural unity in East Asia? This course takes a historical and contemporary approach to understanding East Asia as a region that shares particular cultural connections. Focusing on the nations of China, Korea and Japan, the course will examine the significant religious, historical and political ties in this region. Particular topics examined include the family and the role of the individual in society, both past and present. We will look at overarching social institutions in place as well as individual life experiences in both rural and urban contexts.  East Asian Studies 100 is an introductory level course that assumes no prior knowledge and provides a foundation for understanding questions of continuity and change in this part of the world. 
NOTE: This course may be taken for a C credit.
WRITING INTENSTIVE

EAS 400 Senior Seminar
4 credits
Yu, Bin

Pre-requisite: EAS Senior Majors
A capstone course in which the senior East Asian Studies major integrates the major strands of East Asian history and society around a specific theme and writes an extensive research paper. Every year.
WRITING INTENSTIVE

JAPN 212 Intermediate Japanese II
4 credits
Imai, Terumi

Prerequisite: C- or above in Japanese 211 or placement.       
The course continues to introduce the fundamental Japanese communication skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students will begin to utilize the language to establish contacts with people beyond the walls of Wittenberg, and increase understanding of the Japanese cultural perspective. Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.

JAPN 312 Advanced Japanese II
4 credits
Quimby, Joanne

Prerequisite: C- or above in Japanese 311 or placement.
A continuation of Japanese 311, the goal of the course is to develop culturally and socially appropriate proficiency in the four language skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking.

JAPN 430 Advanced Study of Japanese II
4 credits
Quimby, Joanne

Prerequisite: C- or above in Japanese 312
This course is designed to meet the needs of Japanese language students who have surpassed the highest levels of Japanese language study available in existing courses at the university. Course design will vary in accordance with student need, and may include select readings and conversation activities.

HIST 161C 1W Pre-Modern East Asia
4 credits
Maus, Tanya

Elegant courtiers and eunuchs, ethical scholars, powerful Buddhist nuns, and impudent commoners were some of many groups that created the fabric of East Asian societies during the pre-modern period. This course looks at how such groups within China, Korea and Japan developed the foundations for powerful states and societies with flourishing economies and rich cultural diversity. In particular, we will focus on the inter-relationship of politics, religion, and culture as sources of East Asian interchange and identity. Students’ work will be evaluated through in-class participation, in-class quizzes, presentations and a variety of written assignments.
NOTE: This may be taken for a C credit.
WRITING INTENSTIVE

RELI 134 R/C Japanese and Chinese Religious Traditions
4 credits
Oldstone-Moore, Jennifer

Pre-requisite: None
This course examines both popular and formal religious traditions in China and Japan. The formal traditions, including Taoism, Confucianism, Buddhism, and Shinto, have shaped East Asian family, society, literature, art and even cooking for millennia, all while providing religious and spiritual grounding and meaning. The popular religious traditions of China and Japan are vibrant and lively and permeate everyday life as well as important community festivals and holidays. Our sources will draw on a wide range of texts, videos, images, and religious objects. Classes include both lecture and discussion; students will be evaluated through essay exams, short papers, a project, and analysis of texts.

RELI 200 R/C Pilgrimage
4 credits
Oldstone-Moore, Jennifer

Pilgrimage is an ancient practice in which a person separates him or herself from familiar places, faces and routines to go on a quest to become physically, spiritually, and emotionally closer to the divine. The experience of pilgrimage is described as “liminal” (an in-between state); this state allows for great personal transformation. The range of experiences and stories of pilgrimage ranges from reverently spiritual to the bawdy and wild. In this class we will study major historically important pilgrimages that are still practiced today in Spain, Saudi Arabia, India, China, England, Japan and Korea. Materials will include accounts by pilgrims, videos, and the examination of the costumes and objects pilgrims carry with them (and take home), and the religious and historical significance of these journeys.

RELI 335W C/R Confucianism and Its Critics
4 credits
Oldstone-Moore, Jennifer
 
Confucianism is an expression of values and an orientation to living that has permeated East Asian culture for thousands of years. This seminar will consider the history, central teachings, and institutions of the East Asian Confucian and Neo-Confucian traditions, and Confucianism as manifest in the modern world. We will read pivotal works of Cunfucians including the Analects, the Mencius, and the writings of Ban Zhao, Zhu, Xi, and Tu Wei-ming. These will be assessed in part in contrast to critics of Confucianism, ranging from classical philosophers to twentieth century Marxists and feminist scholars. The course will give students tools to understand important aspects of East Asia not only in the past but also in the present. Class will be conducted seminar style; students will be assessed through tests, presentations, and a term paper.

SOCI 245 W Gender in Society
4 credits
Moskowitz, Nona


So much of our understanding of ourselves is filtered through personal and societal conceptualizations of gender. We begin learning and experiencing social meanings of gender from the moment we are born. Yet, the meanings we learn are not universal. Anthropological studies on gender illustrate that the constructions of sex and gender vary cross-culturally. In this course we will examine how gender plays a role in the making of identities in various parts of the world taking Japan as a case study. Through this case study of Japanese understandings gender, the course will examine the construction of the gendered identities at work and play; sex, gender and the body; relationships and sexualities; public representations of gender; feminism; and other topics.
WRITING INTENSIVE

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