Myes Hall

Course Descriptions

English Course Listings - Spring 2012

English 101E - Introduction to Expository Writing
4 semester hours
Buckman, Ty

Practice in the basic principles of expository writing with a focus on the writing process. Regular reading assignments, lively discussion, peer workshops, four papers, and an abundance of informal writing. (Writing intensive)

English 101E-Introduction to Expository Writing: Self and Society in the Age of Technology
4 semester hours
Inboden, Robin

Our primary goal in this course is, of course, to improve your skills as a writer of expository prose. To that end, we will do a lot of writing of various kinds, focusing on critical thinking, organizational skills, sentence structure, style, and argumentation. After a series of assignments of growing length and complexity, we will ultimately complete a short researched argument. Success in the course will depend on thoughtful reading, active participation and serious work through the process of revision as well as, of course, on the quality of the final papers. Our readings will center around the way our social networking, our dependency on the internet, and our love of our gadgets may affect the way we think of ourselves and the way we form and define our relationships to other people. Writing Intensive.

English 101E - Introduction to Expository Writing
4 semester hours
Heaney, Brian

English 101 is a writing-intensive introductory course designed to teach and refine students' skills in college expository essay writing. Critical reading, discovering topics, structuring essays, crafting thesis statements, paragraph planning, structuring sentences, writing arguments for various purposes, and research are among the topics covered. Assignments include documentation exercises, research notes, evaluation of sources, five rough drafts and five completed essays (three with sources).

English 101E - Introduction to Expository Writing
4 semester hours
Wilkerson, Carmiele

This course has been designed to aid in your development into a confident, responsible and persuasive writer. By the end of this course, students will:

(1) develop competency in all stages of the writing process
(2) develop critical thinking and reading skills
(3) develop a writing standard consistent with the MLA style guid

English 101E - Introduction to Expository Writing
4 semester hours
Erwin, Bonnie

In this class we'll practice the fundamental skills necessary for successful college writing. We'll target core habits of critical reading and thinking that are essential to developing good ideas, and we'll use a variety of writing assignments to practice turning good ideas into good papers. We'll write multiple drafts of each paper, using small group workshops and one-on-one conferences to practice valuable strategies for revision. Grades will be based on four formal papers (a personal narrative, two analytical papers, and a researched argument paper) as well as informal writing assignments and class participation.

Our readings and writings are organized around a theme: "Eating our Words." We'll examine the rhetoric surrounding food (its production, marketing, consumption, etc.) in contemporary America, and we'll focus in particular on how discourses about food intersect with important discussions of subjects like gender, race, and class. Food can seem to be merely an issue of "nature," because of course any animal needs food to survive. Yet for writers, food is more often an issue of "culture," and we'll investigate how such writing allows authors to engage complex questions about who we are, who we should be, and how we should relate to one another.

English 101E - Introduction to Expository Writing
4 semester hours
Hinson, Scot
"Art is not meant to be polite, secret, coded, or timid. Art is the sphere in which the impulse to hide and lie is the most dangerous." Dorothy Allison, "This is Our World".
Taking intellectual and emotional risks lies at the heart of writing. Testing your limits, stretching your intellectual and creative abilities, expanding the boundaries of your intellectual and emotional lives - this is the writer's project. You will only realize your full potential as a thinker and writer by doing more and better work that you ever thought possible, and, above all, by learning to take risks. This course provides you the opportunities and the environment in which to take the risks necessary for writing well.

English 101 is a composition course designed to give you intensive practice in the art of expository writing. The course emphasizes the writing process and the development of clear and purposeful, well-focused writing which addresses a well-defined audience. English 101 will call on your analytical and organizational skills, as well as provide opportunities for you to enhance your ability to design and structure writing and to improve your technical expertise. The course will focus on the conventions of academic discourse and selecting, integrating, and documenting sources. This course is also designed to teach you how to read and write effectively in the University. Also, it will help you to discover that reading and writing are not separate activities, but closely related ones. The course is founded on a belief that learning to read, and see, critically is essential to becoming a proficient, accomplished writer. English 101 requires a series of shorter essays, 4 longer, 5-7 page essays, and an 8-10 page researched essay. There will be a midterm and a final.

English 101E - Introduction to Expository Writing
4 semester hours
McClelland, Michael
This course will teach the writing process through essays, extensive class discussion and work shopping, reading, and journal-keeping. Students will improve their academic writing skills, including grammar and punctuation, and will learn that there is much more to successful writing than the dreaded five-paragraph essay. Along the way, students should learn more about themselves, their world and the many different values of writing, including the revolutionary concept that writing can be fun.

Class requirement includes four papers, class attendance and participation, regular journal writing and frequent in-class writing.

English 101E - Introduction to Expository Writing
4 semester hours
Neis, David

English 101 introduces writing on the college level. Its purpose is to foster the skills necessary to produce coherent, persuasive prose: developing ideas thoroughly, using rhetorical strategies appropriate to subject and audience, focusing and supporting a thesis, structuring well developed paragraphs, generating mature and effective sentences, choosing precise and expressive language, and observing the conventions of written prose.

Individual sections employ a variety of techniques for inculcating standards of good prose; but all 101 classes require a variety of writing assignments including paragraphs and short essays written in and out of class (about 4000 words in total) and a short research paper designed to introduce techniques of library research and documentation (about 2000 words).

English 101E - Introduction to Expository Writing
4 semester hours
Mattison, Michael

"What our beginning students need to learn is to extend themselves, by successive approximations, into the commonplaces, set phrases, rituals and gestures, habits of mind, tricks of persuasion, obligatory conclusions and necessary connections that determine the ‘what might be said' and constitute knowledge within the various branches of our academic community." -David Bartholomae

Bartholomae's words speak to the main question of this class: how do writers "extend" themselves into the conversations that take place within different disciplines? To try and answer that question, we will talk about the various moves that writers make (the commonplaces and set phrases), and we will do so while considering the topic of technology. How have Facebook, video games, cell phones, and other devices affected us? What do others have to say about the issue, and "what might we say" in response?

English 101E - Introduction to Expository Writing
4 semester hours
Thomas, Shannon

As a writing class, this course is designed, first and foremost, to help you develop your analytical and persuasive writing skills. We will write to learn about/develop our ideas, responses, and arguments as well as to communicate these ideas, responses, and arguments to various audiences. The topic for this course is you and your relationship to popular culture. One of the primary goals is for you to connect your college education with your everyday life. To accomplish this goal, I will ask you to resee popular culture and "ordinary" experiences. We will explore different themes (identity, community, and entertainment) and investigate cultural assumptions related to these themes.

English 101E - Introduction to Expository Writing
4 semester hours
Davis, Robert

This course is an introduction to composition. We will cover many of the foundational skills of expository writing in class, and we'll work with style and revision exercises from writing handbooks. But ultimately better writing comes from practice, practice, and more practice. Writing is not a matter of chance or good luck. It's not a matter of first-draft inspiration. Successful prose in all disciplines is based on specific techniques any writer can master. We discover these techniques, in part, by analyzing prose we admire and by applying what we learn in that analysis to our own developing style. For this reason, I'll urge you to become an active reader as well as an active writer and to study the essays and narratives in the course as a source for techniques you can use yourself.

English 101E - Introduction to Expository Writing
4 semester hours
Ravenwood, Emily

This course focuses on critical thinking and writing. In order to write the best possible document, be it a description, argument, report or letter, one must be aware of facts, context, and audience. To foster this awareness we will read essays by a variety of authors, and discuss in class both the issues they write about and the mechanics of how they do so. Students will then apply what we have discovered to their writing. Since good critical thinking includes finding information one may lack to make a good evaluation or argument, we will also cover basic research tactics and how to find information using campus resources such as the library and general resources such as Google. Assignments will include in-class writing and five essays. The first three essays will be submitted, revised, and submitted again, and students will meet individually with the instructor during the term to discuss the revision process.

English 180 - Themes in Children's Literature
4 semester hours
Ravenwood, Emily

Prerequisite: ENGL 101E
The stories we tell our children display many of our beliefs about how the world is and how it should be. This class will read a wide variety of children's and young adult books from the past century, and analyze the themes we find in them. We will look for patterns that repeat over time, and examine what elements change or remain the same. We will read closely to discover what actions thoughts, and ways if relating are supported or denigrated by these stories.
Class work will include reading one book a week, participating in discussion in class and/or online, six two-page papers, and a term paper.
Some learning goals for the course are:
To gain skill in close reading and textual analysis
To become familiar with some of the vocabulary of literary study
To learn how to find cross-connections between multiple texts
To research historical context and existing analyses
This is a writing-intensive course. Students will be expected to already have experience writing academic essays to Wittenberg standards. This class will focus on increasing the skills particular to writing and supporting literary analysis.

English 180A - Women in Classical Hollywood Cinema
4 semester hours
Inboden, Robin

Prerequisite: ENGL 101E
From Bette Davis' eyes and Joan Crawford's shoulders to Rita Hayworth's legs and Judy Garland's ruby slippers, Hollywood stars have defined our ideas, for better or worse, of modern womanhood. In this course we will begin by learning some basic terminology and approaches to analyzing film as an art form. Centering on the Classical Hollywood Cinema (1930-1960), we will then turn to a thematic and historical consideration of the various kinds of roles assigned to women in different films and film genres. We will see how certain types of women-madcap heiresses, long suffering mothers, lonely career women, sex symbols, and femmes fatales, for instance-have defined stars' careers, and, more importantly, our society's images of women. The graded work of the course will consist of a shot-by-shot film analysis, several short papers, and a final exam. Writing Intensive. Counts towards Women's Studies minor.

 

English 180 - Transformations
4 semester hours
Erwin, Bonnie

Prerequisite: ENGL 101E
We humans are uniquely preoccupied with the idea of personal transformation—we often define who we are by imagining who or what we might become instead. The transformed self is a prominent theme in literature and other arts: across the centuries, we persist in telling stories about peoples transformed into animals (or vice versa), or about peoples who undergo a supernatural change to become super- or sub-human. In American culture, the idea of personal transformation in more everyday terms is a particularly cherished one: we constantly strive to remake our bodies, our lives, and our communities. F. Scott Fitzgerald once famously asserted that "there are no second acts in American lives," yet we also treasure the notion that "second acts" of various kinds are attainable through processes of self-reinvention.

This course examines the rhetoric and representation of transformation in literature, graphic fiction, memoir, and "reality" television. In our readings and writings, we'll investigate how these artifacts shape cultural values by asking audiences to transform themselves or to redefine what it means to be a "good" or valuable member of society. This is a writing intensive course, and requirements will likely include several short papers, midterm and final exams, and active daily participation in class discussions.

English 180 - "End of Days: Dystopian World Literature"
4 semester hours
Thomas, Shannon

Prerequisite: ENGL 101
What happens when the world as we know it ends? What society or form of government would take its place? What happens when existing social ills are taken to extremes in a not so distant future? What is it like to live in these new worlds? This course will explore these questions through the genre of dystopian literature from around the world. By imagining new worlds, and past and future realities, dystopian literature offers critiques of existing social conditions or political systems. We will read a variety of dystopian literature as well as reactions and responses to this literature. Potential texts will likely be selected from the following works: George Orwell's 1984, Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451, Alan Moore's graphic novel V for Vendetta, Kazuo Ishiguro's Never Let Me Go, Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale, Octavia Butler's The Parable of the Sower, and Suzanne Collier's young adult novel The Hunger Games.. The course will likely require 2-3 essays, a midterm and final exam, and an opportunity to write your own dystopian story or poem.

English 180 - Literature and Madness
4 semester hours
Davis, Robert

Prerequisite: ENGL 101E
If it's haunted, freaky, surrealistic, or strange, it's probably in this course. In "Literature and Madness" we'll study depictions of mental illness by American writers and examine literature that mixes terror and beauty—an idea that's shaped American notions of spirituality, subjectivity, and creative power since the 18th century. We'll study literary representations of depression, addiction, suicide, schizophrenia, and combat trauma. We'll read a brand of horror story H. P. Lovecraft calls "the weird tale" and consider how modern writers use tales of madness to explore experiences of trauma that are too hot to handle in the daylight world of reason and sense. But we'll also stretch the notion of "the weird tale" to include poetry, photography, and film. No previous experience with American literature is necessary, but it helps if you like to read. Prepare to be surprised, fascinated, and possessed.

ENGL 190A/C - Afro-Caribbean Studies: Migratory Subjects
4 semester hours
Wilkerson, Carmiele

Prerequisite: English 101E
This course will introduce students to the literary works and cultural history of English-speaking Caribbean authors. The course will study closely an historical group, "The Windrush Generation," Caribbean men and women who immigrated to Great Britain in search of better lives for themselves and for their families. The course will ground class lecture in issues of migration and the politics of identity for the Anglophone Caribbean in Great Britain. We will discover the beauty of the works by selected authors as they lead us on the path of discovery into the world of literature, language and culture. This course is designated A (The student should gain an understanding of aesthetic experience and of how the arts enrich and express the human spirit.) and C (The student should gain an understanding of the diversity of non-Western cultures through a study of the history, institutions, or traditions of one or more of these cultures.) Thus, the course will integrate both the aesthetic and socio-historic aspects of the literature and the time period.

English 200 - Literary Studies
4 semester hours
Davis, Robert

Prerequisite: ENGL 170H or ENGL 180A or ENGL 190
This course is designed to prepare students for advanced literary study. It refines close-reading skills developed in earlier literature classes, introduces students to different approaches to literary criticism, and helps develop a working knowledge of literary theory. The first half of the course is an introduction to modern poetry (with a glance back at two 19th-century poets: Emily Dickinson and Gerard Manley Hopkins). We'll study poems of friendship, mourning, sexuality, trauma, and spiritual vision. In the second half of the course, we'll consider the theme of violence and recovery in modern literature. We'll see a woman descending into schizophrenic madness (in F. Scott Fitzgerald's Tender is the Night), a traumatized combat veteran convinced he's been abducted by aliens (in Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse-Five), and a college-professor-turned-would-be-killer (in Don Delillo's White Noise). At times, the violence of modern experience robs people of speech and the novels we'll study are filled with characters who experience their lives as hollow, fictive, ghostly, and unreal. Some characters barely speak above a whisper. Others speak only in ad slogans, TV clichés, or the monotone mantra of Vonnegut's Billy Pilgrim: so it goes. We'll also encounter characters, however, who speak themselves back from the dead, authoring their own life-saving fictions. Finding one's voice is more than a creative writing cliché in modern literature. It's a way of pushing back against the voicelessness of deep trauma and recovering the promise of intimacy and shared expression.

English 240 - Beginning Creative Writing
4 semester hours
Fallon, D'Arcy

Prerequisite: ENGL 101 and ENGL 180A or ENGL 190A/C
This course will introduce students to the essential elements of good writing, focusing on fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama. Throughout the semester, students will read representative texts and study the fundamental elements of all these genres.

This course is centered around the "workshop,''—essentially informal peer critique of student work as well as close reading and class discussion of selected texts. We'll read and analyze, discuss and critique, but most of all we'll be a community of people who write. Students will produce pieces in all four genres. There are no exams, but there may be an occasional quiz. The grade is based on a writing portfolio of one's best, revised work, which will be handed in at the end of the semester. The rest of the grade will be based on a journal/writer's notebook and class participation. Textbooks: The Poet's Companion by Kim Addonizio and Dorianne Laux, Creative Writing: Four Genres in Brief by David Starkey Prerequisite: English 101

English 241 - Beginning Journalism
4 semester hours
McClelland, Michael

Prerequisite: English 101
This course will provide a basic introduction to the practice and principles of journalism, with an emphasis on newspaper production. We will discuss news, features, opinion and sports writing; interviewing skills, journalistic ethics, copy-editing, layout, and other related topics. Students will write regularly, and will be expected to contribute to The Torch, Wittenberg's weekly student newspaper.

242. Writing Center - Theory and Practice
4 semester hours
Mattison, Michael

Prerequisite: ENGL 101E and Permission
This course will focus on writing processes, interpersonal dynamics, questioning techniques, evaluation of writing-in-progress, and rhetorical theory as they pertain to working one-to-one with writers. This class, designed primarily to prepare writing advisors for the Wittenberg Writing Center, will work closely with the students in a section of English 101 through several writing assignments. By permission of instructor only—students must apply through the Writing Center. Prerequisite: English 101. Writing intensive.

English 280 - British Survey I
4 semester hours
Buckman, Ty

Prerequisite: ENGL 170H, ENGL 180A or ENGL 190A/C
In this survey for English literature from its beginnings to the early eighteenth century, students will be introduced to the writings of a variety of authors working in a variety of genres: sonnet, dramatic comedy, epic poem, essay, novel, and others. In order to impose some structure on a rather diverse body of writings, we will trace several broad themes across these works while attending to, so far as possible in a course of this type, the historical milieux in which these texts were written and read or performed. A reading journal, three papers, a midterm and final. Writing intensive.

English 290 - American Literary Themes and Traditions: American Gothic
4 semester hours
Hinson, Scot

Prerequisite: ENGL 170, ENGL 180A or ENGL A/C
Through an examination of the American Gothic, its origins and its contemporary manifestations, we will explore the difficult, bloody, and painful birth of American literature as well as its continued fascination with and terror of what Melville called the "power of blackness" and the sublime mixture of terror and beauty. This course is driven by America's fascination with Gothic literature, and with what can accurately be described as a Gothic revival in American culture. What is it about the shadowy, diseased, the grotesque, and sublime that so attracts us? What scares us and what spectral shapes do those fears inhabit in our literature? This course in the American Gothic is definitely not for the squeamish and requires frequent reading quizzes, one short and one longer researched essay, a midterm and a final, and a group presentation and bibliography.

English 307 - Private Matters, Social Networks: Reading the Eighteenth Century in the Age of Facebook
4 credit hours
Richards, Cynthia

Prerequisite: ENGL 200 and ENGL 280A
The eighteenth century USED to be considered the time of the greatest sociological change in both the nature of the private and the public. Indeed, to engage in the hyperbole of the discipline, it was when the self was invented, and simultaneously when the social grew more pluralistic. The ubiquity of print media—the broadside, the magazine, among other new forms—and the rise of the novel made the world a very different place, representing democratic changes unsettling to those who had long favored the more stable transmission of knowledge found in the reading of classic, long-established texts. Both the American Revolution and the French were in part attributed to these new reading habits.

Sound familiar? It should. For the eighteenth century has recently been supplanted by the Age of Facebook as the time of greatest sociological change in both the nature of the private and the public. Print media is now on its way out and electronic media is causing the same kind of anxieties in the world. What will happen to the book? Is twitter the new broadside? Is the blog the new novel? Does Facebook steal from us our privacy or rather give us a new and more impenetrable social mask? Democratic changes have also followed suit: the Arab Spring and now Occupy Wall Street sit-in are both being attributed to these new technologies of information transmission.

This course will examine the eighteenth century with these contemporary connections in mind. It will focus heavily on classic theories of self/privacy (Habermas, for example) and the emerging theories of the so-called "digital divide." It will look at the novel as a precursor to facebook and the blog. It will also look at the art of journal writing in the eighteenth century and its various public and private manifestations, including Defoe's Journal of a Plague Year, and Pepys, Boswell, and Burney's personal diaries. In addition, it will look at the emerging poetry of the personal, including that of John Wilmot, Thomas Gray, and William Cowper. Shorter written assignments will ask you to explore the connections between then and now, and possibly create a facebook page for one of our authors/characters. A 12-15 page research paper will allow you to explore in detail a topic of your own. (This course is writing intensive and also includes a midterm and a final.)

English 309 B Studies in Victorian Lit. and Culture: Victorian Arts and Society
4 semester hours
Inboden, Robin

Prerequisite: ENGL 200 and ENGL 280A
The artsBliterary, visual, performing, and architecturalBwere exceptionally intertwined in Victorian England, and the aesthetic principles underlying those art forms reflected and often reinforced the culture=s notions about morality, history, religion, and the balancing of the personal with the public, desire with duty. Major Victorian Asages@ such as Ruskin looked at paintings and buildings and nature and saw the dangers—and the salvation—of industrial Britain; poets such as D. G. Rossetti were also painters; novelists such as Dickens and Hardy exposed social evils and inspired reforms with their novels; Tennyson contemplated scientific discoveries in geology and paleontology and tried through his art to define a personal, loving God; the great novelist Marianne Evans (George Eliot) was celebrated as Athe great moralist@ for her books while being marginalized in private life for her Aimmorality.@ While we will mainly study examples of literary art, we will also become familiar with Victorian painting, sculpture, theatre, and architecture and the ideologies behind the aesthetics, including the question of realism and the morality of art. We will also be touching on major themes in Victorian culture such as industrialization, class distinction, the woman question, and the interrogation of spiritual beliefs. We will read texts by such authors as Carlyle, Ruskin, Tennyson, Barrett Browning, Browning, Morris, the Rossettis, Dickens, Eliot, Hardy, and Wilde. We will also have the rare opportunity to attend a Wittenberg mainstage production of a Victorian musical by Gilbert and Sullivan. The graded work for the course will consist of short quizzes, two shorter papers, a comprehensive final exam, and a longer researched critical paper. Writing intensive.

ENGL 315 - African Novels: Novels of the African Diaspora
4 semester hours
Wilkerson, Carmiele

Prerequisite: Engl 200
Novels of the African Diaspora will examine several major authors of African ancestry. The course will review the cultural history of the African Diaspora through literature that spans Africa, the Caribbean, England and the United States. We will read several important novels and essays (and a bit of poetry) in this course that introduces students to post-colonial studies in Africana literature. Authors to look forward to reading include: Derek Walcott, W.E.B. Du Bois, Chinua Achebe, Norbese Phillip, Edwidge Danticat, Ama Ata Aidoo and Ngugi wa Thiong'o and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie among others.

English 315 - Learning to Live: Contemporary American Fiction
4 semester hours
Hinson, Scot

Prerequisite: ENGL 200 and ENGL 290A
In the 21st century is it naïve to believe that literature can teach us something about how to live better lives? At various times throughout history, critics have believed that imaginative literature was mere lies, fabrications, distracting us from reality and more often than not, the work of the devil. So, why do we read imaginative literature? In recent decades, literary scholars have taken up, again, the question of morality and literature. What is the relationship between a "good" book and its inherent moral value—are beautifully written books always moral? Can reading imaginative literature help us to become, in Henry James' words, "people on whom nothing is lost," people whose moral sensibilities and empathetic powers are finely tuned? What, if anything, changes when we read literature in search of moral principles that might help shape our values and beliefs? In Contemporary American Fiction, we'll try to answer this question by reading some of the latest fiction being written in North America. We'll read in a variety of genres, including magical realism and speculative fiction, and from a range of ethnic literatures. The course will include writers like Louise Erdrich, Don DeLillo, Joyce Carol Oates, Toni Morrison, Cormac McCarthy, Margaret Atwood, Thomas Pynchon, Marilynne Robinson, Ann Patchett, Jhumpa Lahiri, Susan Straight, and others. Reading and writing intensive, this course requires frequent reading quizzes, a series of short essays, a comprehensive final examination, and a final research project.

English 321 - Advanced Feature Writing
4 semester hours
Fallon, D'Arcy

Prerequisite: English 241
This course focuses on long newspaper and magazine features and profiles, as well as other kinds of "literary" and "immersion" reportage. Students will learn crucial skills needed to envision and shape feature stories and they will study and practice different story-telling modes. This course also covers the query letter, conducting research and interviews, analyzing the market, and the editor-writer relationship, among other things. This is a rigorous, writing-intensive course where revision is not only encouraged but expected. Students must send out at least one article to an outside publication.

English 341 - Advanced Poetry
4 semester hours
Rambo, Jody

Prerequisite: ENGL 240
If poems are, as Jorie Graham writes, "records of true risks taken by the soul of the speaker" then the intent of this advanced writing course in poetry is to create the conditions for taking such risks. The course will be composed of equal parts reading and writing poetry to introduce students to developments in contemporary poetry and to help them develop further their craft. Students will also explore different forms of poetry such as the sonnet, villanelle, and sestina, along with free verse and prose poems. Regular writing workshops, a poet's notebook, diverse reading assignments, and a final manuscript. Prerequisite: English 240 or instructor's permission.

English 403 - Special Projects in Creative Writing
4 semester hours
McClelland, Mac

Prerequisite: Department Permission
Special Projects in Creative Writing offers serious creative writing students an opportunity to produce a significant piece in their chosen genre, whether that be fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, or screenwriting. Using both extensive class workshopping and regular meetings with the professor, students will produce a project of their own design, for example, a novella or novel section, a collection of related short stories, or a theme-driven collection of poems. Admission to the course is based on a writing sample and a brief written project proposal.

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