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Course Descriptions

East Asian Studies Course Listings - Spring 2013

ART 280C 1W Topic:  Buddhist Art of Asia
4 credits
Glowski, Janice

No prerequisites
This course surveys Buddhist art and architecture throughout Asia, including South Asia (India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka), the Himalayas (Nepal, Tibet, Bhutan), and East Asia (China, Japan).  Art from Southeast Asia and other countries, such as Mongolia, Korea and the United States is considered briefly for comparative purposes.  As visual culture, the artwork is examined for its role in articulating Buddhist theories and practices within unique historical and cultural contexts.

BUSN 290 01 Business & Management in East Asia
4 credits
Jeong, Sunny

No prerequisites
Asia, ablaze with economic energy, is changing the shape of the world
economy and the scope and nature of competition among the world's
companies. Western firms face a world far different and more challenging
than just a few years ago, thanks largely to the rise of new and
increasingly powerful competitors from Japan, Korea and now China. This
course provides an introduction to the variety of ways in which business
is conducted in East Asia. It also provides a foundation in cultural and
political aspects of business in East Asia, which tend to be thoroughly
intertwined in international business.

BUSN 290 02 Global Leadership & Social Entrepreneurship in East Asia
4 credits
Jeong, Sunny

No prerequisites
With the traditional lines between for-profit enterprise, nonprofit enterprise,
and government beginning to blur, it is critical that students understand
this emerging, highly interdisciplinary field of social entrepreneurship.
This class highlights how social enterprises and challenges in East Asia
differ from that of Western European and American. Students will work on
social venture business plan in this class and selected students will
travel to East Asia to participate in a business plan competition during
summer of 2013.

CHIN 112F 01 Beginning Chinese II
5 credits
Chan, Shelley

Prerequisites:  Chinese 111 or placement.
Continuation of 111.  Gaining further skill in using putonghua with every day conversational topics will be important.  We will also learn to read and write more of the characters used to represent those concepts. Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.

CHIN 130A/C 01/02 Chinese Women Writers: Ancient and Modern
4 credits
Chan, Shelley

Taught in English.  No prerequisites.
Chinese women have been known as the suppressed sex for thousands of years.  Nevertheless, women’s writing has always been an important part of Chinese literature.  Whereas the long history of pre-modern China produced a rather large number of women writers, the concept of “women’s literature” emerged only in the early twentieth century when enormous changes in Chinese women’s social status occurred after the May Fourth Movement of 1919.  Moreover, since 1949 Communist China has witnessed further rapid changes as far as women’s writing is concerned.

This course is a general introduction to Chinese women writers in different historical periods, namely, pre-modern, modern, and contemporary.  To help students understand the gender issue, it provides them with a cultural background from the Confucian patriarchy to the Maoist “equality” between the sexes, as well as a background on cultural norms toward Chinese women.  It discovers women’s voice in a traditionally male-centered society and literature, examines the feminine/masculine opposition, studies how Chinese women writers have not only formed their own voice, but also often led the way in the literary development of the post-Mao period.  The readings, including poetry, prose and fiction, will be buttressed by films.  All readings, discussions and lectures will be in English. The movies will have English subtitles.

CHIN 212 01 Intermediate Chinese II
5 credits
Choy, Howard

Prerequisites:  Chinese 211 or placement
This is the second part of a two-semester course in intermediate Chinese.  Students will continue to develop the basic language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in daily life situations and self-expressions.  It is intended to lay a solid foundation for everyday communication in Chinese and further study of the language.  Students should be prepared for a steady expansion of their vocabulary and are expected to speak the language in classroom activities.  Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.

CHIN 330 1W Topic:  Translation Workshop
4 credits
Choy, Howard

Prerequisites:  Chinese 311 or permission of instructor
This is a third year course in advanced Chinese. Students will advance from the basic language skills to the practices and theories of translation from Chinese to English and English to Chinese. By the end of this course, students will have developed skills in translating literary, commercial, legal texts, etc. To create an interactive language workshop, we will adopt a content-based and task-oriented approach, emphasizing knowledge, accuracy, and creativity at the same time. Resource materials will be chosen according to students' academic interests. 
Writing intensive

EAST 190C Popular Culture and Cinema Contemporary Korea                       
4 credits
Rhee, Jooyeon

This introductory course on Korean popular culture and cinema aims to provide a comprehensive view of contemporary Korean society, politics and economy through examining some of the most representative forms of popular culture. It investigates the ways in which contemporary Korean popular media such as film, TV-drama, social media and popular music convey everyday life of Koreans; and explains how these forms of culture are co-related to rapidly changing global environment. It introduces newly emerging Korean filmmakers, sports players, musicians, entrepreneurs in the entertainment industry, all of whom play interesting roles in domestic and international markets. 10/12

EAST 290C 01 Topic:  Modern Korean Literature                                   
4 credits
Rhee, Jooyeon

This course examines some of the most representative modern literature of twentieth-century Korea, analyzing its historical, political, and cultural significance. Divided into two parts, colonial and postcolonial, it frames the works of key writers in the context of colonialism, nationalism, democratic and labor movements, gender, religion, and global capitalism. Visual materials (films, photographs, illustrations, etc.) will be incorporated into the lectures, and class readings will include critical essays on Korean culture and literature. No knowledge of Korean is required. 10/12

ECON 260C 01 East Asian Economies
4 credits
Frost, Marcia

Prerequisites: ECON 190
This course is designed to introduce students to some of the most important and pressing current issues facing the Northeastern Asian economies of China, Mongolia and North Korea; to new economic concepts, theories and models; and to many sub-fields of the discipline, including economic history, environmental economics, political economy, comparative economics, institutional economics and economies in transition.  It is also multidisciplinary, integrating economics with political science, geography, geology, sociology, environmental science, history, and business. 
NOTE:  Cross-listed with East Asian Studies and International Studies; CLAC option; may be Writing Intensive; offered each year.

HIST 164C 01 Modern China
4 credits
Maus, Tanya

Prerequisites: None
Using primary sources (first-hand accounts), visual media, and scholarly essays, this course examines the sweeping historical changes that have shaped modern China. In particular, we will examine the ways in which individuals interacted with larger internal and external forces to create dynastic and revolutionary change, from the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911), to Republican Nationalism (1912-1949), and into the Mao Era (1949-1976). We will conclude by exploring how this history of change and competing voices has translated into China in the present.  Students’ work will be evaluated through in-class participation, in-class quizzes, presentations and a variety of written assignments.

HIST 202C 1W Hiroshima’s Shadows
4 credits
Maus, Tanya

Prerequisites: None
The course explores how historians write and interpret history by examining the historical debates and historical memory of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in Japan from 1945 to the present. We will consider how the understanding of the atomic bombings and the reasons for the bombings have changed over time in Japanese public discourse by focusing on primary and secondary sources written by Japanese scientists, artists, and literary figures from 1945 to the present. The understanding of Japanese atomic bomb discourse will be deepened by also pursuing the changing historical memory of the atomic bombings in the United States, since the national narratives of the atomic bombing in the US and Japan are deeply intertwined. This course will engage students in the study of the diverse perspectives within Japan regarding the atomic bombing. In particular, the course will look at differing atomic bomb narratives (for example, those of Korean victims of the bombing and current cancer victims that continue trace their illness to the atomic bombings) in Japan that have been often excluded from public memory and that struggle to survive in the face of erasure from the political center. Students’ work will be evaluated through in-class participation, in-class quizzes, presentations and a variety of written assignments.
Writing Intensive

HIST 263C 01 Japan’s Medieval Past
4 credits
Maus, Tanya

Prerequisites:  None
Japan’s Medieval Past is most often viewed through the rise of a ruling warrior (samurai) class. However, long before the age of the samurai, civil officials, aristocratic women, monks, and wandering performers created an unprecedented age of political, social, artistic and literary achievement that drew on rich and diverse traditions from within and without Japan. Through the use of primary historical sources, literature, and classic film by directors such as Akira Kurosawa and Mizoguchi Kenji, this course will examine Japan’s complex medieval heritage beginning with the rise of a stable imperial rule in the sixth century and ending with the anarchy of the warring states period of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. Students will be evaluated according to quizzes, weekly journal responses, a variety of written assignments, and two substantial class presentation.
NOTE:  This course counts toward the PAST minor

JAPN 112F 01 Beginning Japanese II
5 credits
Quimby, Joanne

Prerequisites: Japanese 111 or placement
The course continues to introduce the basic Japanese communication skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing.  Students will increase understanding of the Japanese cultural perspective, and gain insight into the nature of language study.  Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.

JAPN 130 A/C 01 Images of Japan:  Cultural History of Japan
4 credits
Quimby, Joanne

Prerequisites: None.  Taught in English
This course is an introduction to Japanese culture through images—literary and visual representations and other ideas and concepts which have become solidified as “images of Japan” the popular imagination. Through readings, films, artwork, manga, and other materials we will consider major “images” of Japan, and will reflect upon how these images are created, disseminated, reinforced, and/or challenged.

JAPN 212 01 Intermediate Japanese II
5 credits
Imai, Terumi

Prerequisites:  C- or above in Japanese 211 or placement.            
The course continues to introduce the fundamental Japanese communication skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing.  Students will begin to utilize the language to establish contacts with people beyond the walls of Wittenberg, and increase understanding of the Japanese cultural perspective.  Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required. 10/12

JAPN 230A/C 01 From Page to Screen: Modern Japanese Literature in Film
4 credits
Quimby, Joanne

Prerequisites:  Taught in English.   
In this course, students will read and analyze a selection of Japanese novels and short stories, and will then watch film adaptations of the same works. We will consider issues of adaptation, audience response, message/meaning as we consider these works as literary and cinematic arts. We will also discuss cultural and historical background as necessary. This course will equip students with the tools necessary to appreciate and analyze these two art forms of artistic expression, and will provide a forum for them to gauge and reflect on their own reactions.

JAPN 312 01 Advanced Japanese II
4 credits
Imai, Terumi

Prerequisite: C- or above in Japanese 311 or placement
A continuation of Japanese 311, the goal of the course is to develop culturally and socially appropriate proficiency in the four language skills:  reading, writing, listening and speaking.

PSYC 280C 01 Topic :  Psychology & Culture
4 credits
Crane, Lauren

Prerequisites:  Sophomore standing (or higher)

People cannot speak without having an accent from somewhere. In much the same way, people's psychological functioning is not accent-free. This course highlights the extent to which all levels of psychological functioning, even "basic" ones, are grounded in culture-specific assumptions about what matters, what is "good”, and how the world works. Students are expected to emerge from this class with a sharpened ability to critique generalizations made about human psychology, a greater appreciation of interpersonal diversity, and a richer understanding of how their own ways of thinking and being derive from culture-bound experiences. Course requirements include exams, research projects, and class participation. This course contains substantial East Asian content and counts toward the East Asian Studies major/minor. This course also includes an optional “Cultures and Languages across the Curriculum” (CLAC) component.

RELI 100C/R 01Topics: Introduction to Buddhism
4 credits
Oldstone-Moore, Jennifer

Buddhism, one of the great world religions, has numerous manifestations through time and a variety of cultures. In this course we will examine the Buddhist tradition beginning with its founder, Siddharta Gautama. We will also explore key Buddhist teachings in the Theravada (South Asia) and Mahayana (Central and East Asia) traditions, including the Vajaryana (Tibetan) school.  A significant amount of the course will look at contemporary manifestations of Buddhism, including recent growth outside of Asia. In this course we will look not only at ideas of Buddhism, but also Buddhism in practice. 

RELI 200C/R 01 Topic:  Pilgrimage-Journey to the Sacred Religion
4 credits
Oldstone-Moore, Jennifer

Pilgrimage is an ancient practice in which a person separates him or herself from familiar places, faces and routines to go on a quest to become physically, spiritually, and emotionally closer to the divine.  The experience of pilgrimage is described as “liminal” (an in-between state); this state allows for great personal transformation.  The range of experiences and stories of pilgrimage ranges from reverently spiritual to the bawdy and wild.  In this class we will study major historically important pilgrimages that are still practiced today in Spain, Saudi Arabia, India, China, England, Japan and Korea. Materials will include accounts by pilgrims, videos, and the examination of the costumes and objects pilgrims carry with them (and take home), and the religious and historical significance of these journeys.

RELI 339C/R 1W Monkeys Samurai and Gods: Religion and Literature in East Asia
4 credits
Oldstone-Moore, Jennifer
 
Prerequisites:  None

This seminar will look at religious meaning and message in some of the best loved literature of China and Japan, including Journey to the West, Tale of Heike, Dream of the Red Chamber, Account of my Hut, and others. Class will be a combination of lecture and discussion, with student presentations and a term paper. Videos and other media will be used when possible. 
Writing intensive

SOCI 201C Anime and Youth Culture in Japan
4 credits
Moskowitz, Nona
Prerequisites: None
Recently, studies of young people and youth culture have occupied a more central place in anthropological inquiry. These studies on minors demonstrate that far from being passive receptors of socialization, young people are active agents, shaping and creating the worlds in which they exist. This course is an exploration into the anthropology of childhood as considered from Japan. In the course, we will be examining multiple facets of Japanese youth and youth culture by asking, what are the experiences of young people in Japan? What worlds do adults create for them and what worlds do they create for themselves? Anime, the motion-picture animations (cartoons) that are produced in Japan, will be a special topic in the course. We will look at anime as viewed in Japan, its popularity abroad, and the communities that create and consume anime. Additionally, we will consider other aspects of Japanese youth culture such as manga (graphic novels), fashion, and music.

SOCI 245C/S 1W & 2W Gender and Society
4 credits
Moskowitz, Nona

So much of our understanding of ourselves is filtered through personal and societal conceptualizations of gender. We begin learning and experiencing social meanings of gender from the moment we are born. Yet, the meanings we learn are not universal.  Anthropological studies on gender illustrate that the constructions of sex and gender vary cross-culturally.  In this course we will examine how gender plays a role in the making of identities in various parts of the world taking Japan as a case study. Through this case study of Japanese understandings gender, the course will examine the construction of the gendered identities at work and play; sex, gender and the body; relationships and sexualities; public representations of gender; feminism; and other topics.
Writing intensive

THDN 013P 01 Tai Chi & Tai Chi Sword
1 credit
Li-Chang, Shih-Ming

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