Myes Hall

Course Descriptions

English Course Listings - Spring 2013

English 101E – Introduction to Expository Writing
4 semester hours
Reno, Seth

English 101 is a first-year writing course that aims to introduce you to the skills in critical thinking, reading, and writing that you will use throughout your college career at Wittenberg. The particular theme for this section of 101 is “Food and Culture.” In addition to the textbook, we will read, discuss, and view essays, articles, films, documentaries, television shows, and other cultural texts that deal in some way with the relationship between food and culture. Why food? Because it’s everywhere. And it’s delicious. Food communicates in subtle and significant ways ideas and values about self, identity, and culture. As the old saying goes: “Tell me what you eat and I will tell you what you are.” Food writing is pervasive in all media—food blogs, reality television, entire channels devoted solely to food. Food and politics—and the politics of food—have flooded the independent documentary film industry. And each one of us interacts with, craves, demands, requires, and enjoys food every day. Food informs cultural, religious, and political identity, so writing and thinking about food is also always writing and thinking about culture, self, and identity.

English 101E – Introduction to Expository Writing, section 8W
4 semester hours
Reno, Seth

English 101 is a first-year writing course that aims to introduce you to the skills in critical thinking, reading, and writing that you will use throughout your college career at Wittenberg. The particular theme for this section of 101 is “Nature and the Environment.” In addition to the textbook, we will read, discuss, and view essays, articles, films, documentaries, television shows, and other cultural texts that deal in some way with nature and the environment. The idea of “nature” has played a fundamental role in the development of American culture, and it holds a unique place in the American consciousness. From the vast and untamed wilderness confronted by early Puritans to the emergence of large, industrial cities to the destructive forces produced by global warming, “nature” is often at the center of American discourse. Some questions we will consider throughout the quarter: What counts as nature? How does one represent nature? How does nature affect politics/politics affect nature? What does it mean to be natural/unnatural? What is human nature? What is the relationship between humans and animals? and Who gets to decide?
This section of English 101 is paired with Biology 104: Biology on the Big Screen (taught by Dr. Amber Burgett). There will be overlap between these two courses, including shared class sessions, readings, film viewings, writing projects, and excursions. Students who are interested in the intersections between the humanities and sciences, as well as those who intend to pursue an English/Biology double major or minor, are encouraged to register for both classes.

English 101E – Expository Writing:  Food for Thought: Cultural Literacy for Hungry Minds
4 semester hours
Fallon, D’Arcy

Food. We all eat it. We all need it. Whether our favorite meal is waffles with tofutti ice cream or a big beef burrito from Chipotle’s, food is the engine that keeps us burning.  But how much do we really know about our relationship with food? It’s complicated. In this English 101 class, we’ll look at the role food plays in agriculture, ethics, culture, gender awareness, spirituality, and politics. As we do, we’ll practice the fundamentals necessary for successful college writing, from critical reading and thinking to developing good ideas for papers. We’ll write multiple drafts of each paper, using small group workshops and one-on-one conferences to learn valuable strategies for revision.

English 101E – Introduction to Expository Writing
4 semester hours
Hinson, Scot

Taking intellectual and emotional risks lies at the heart of writing.  Testing your limits, stretching your intellectual and creative abilities, expanding the boundaries of your intellectual and emotional lives--this is the writer’s project.  You will only realize your full potential as a thinker and writer by doing more and better work than you ever thought possible, and, above all, by learning to take risks.  This course provides you the opportunities and the environment in which to take the risks necessary for thinking analytically and writing well.  English 101 is a composition course designed to give you intensive practice in the art of expository writing.  The course emphasizes the writing process and the development of clear and purposeful, well focused writing, which addresses a well-defined audience.  English 101 will call on your analytical and organizational skills, as well as provide opportunities for you to enhance your ability to design and structure writing and to improve your technical expertise.  The course will focus on the conventions of academic discourse and selecting, integrating, and documenting sources.  This course is also designed to teach you how to read and write effectively at Wittenberg.  Also, it will help you to discover that reading and writing are not separate activities, but closely related ones.  The course is founded on the belief that learning to read, see, and think analytically is essential to becoming a proficient, accomplished writer.  Writing Intensive.
English 101E – Introduction to Expository Writing
4 semester hours
Smith, Fitz

This course will introduce the student to the work of Greco-Roman myth.  With intensive readings of The Iliad, The Odyssey, The Aeneid, and The Inferno, this course not only will consider the various stories and ideas that myths construct and entail, but also will work to consider their importance to the literature that we commonly call ‘The Western Tradition’.  This course will emphasize student engagement with the readings and ideas, so class sessions will entail lecture but rely heavily upon class participation.  The student will leave this course with a familiarity with the dominant myths of the ancients, as well as a broadened understanding of those myths by which we live---myths more naively known as reality.

English 101E – Introduction to Expository Writing
4 semester hours
Incorvati, Rick

In this class we will approach writing as having both a private and a public function.  First, we will use writing as a means of personal reflection and as a way of examining and sharpening your own ideas.  Then, we will focus on writing as an avenue for informing and influencing others, and we will practice using some techniques that can make your ideas more persuasive to a critical audience.  In the process of preparing your writing for this public function, you will have opportunities to hone your research and writing skills, and you will read essays by some influential writers who have attempted to win over their readers on such topics as environmental policy, civil rights, and freedom of speech.  The writing component of this class involves multiple drafts and critical feedback from classmates.

English 101E – Introduction to Expository Writing
4 semester hours
McClelland, Michael
This course will teach the writing process through essays, extensive class discussion and workshopping, reading, and journal-keeping. Students will improve their academic writing skills, including grammar and punctuation, and will learn that there is much more to successful writing than the dreaded five-paragraph essay. Along the way, students should learn more about themselves, their world and the many different values of writing, including the revolutionary concept that writing can be fun.
Class requirements include four papers, class attendance and participation, regular journal writing and frequent in-class writing.

English 101E – Introduction to Expository Writing
4 semester hours
Askeland, Lori

Theme: “Begging, Borrowing and Stealing.”  The quip “amateur poets borrow; professionals steal,” often attributed to the poet T.S. Eliot, suggests a potentially dangerous paradox. This course is designed to ask questions rooted in that misquotation:  what roles do copying and imitation play in learning, and the creation of new works of writing, art, music, and life in general?  After all, writing in English really just means the re-arranging of the same old 26 letters of the alphabet into words and grammatical structures shared by most speakers of the language for hundreds of years—no one “owns” the alphabet.   Likewise with most musical composition—there are a limited number of notes and keys available.  Artists are always in a kind of “conversation”—they “quote” from each other and talk back to famous images. What does it mean to write an “original” piece, as opposed to something that is “derivative”?  What is “plagiarism,” and what is “allusion,” what is “sampling”—and are they that different?  Is “theft” ever a good thing, if done cleverly enough (as the quip suggests)?  What’s the purpose of copyright law?  Does it stifle creativity or promote it?  Is it appropriate to think of all these kinds of acts, in different contexts, as similar?  What role, if any, does socioeconomic power or social status play in determining which instances of “stealing” we take seriously and treat as crimes, and those that we either ignore or even celebrate?  What if a scientist takes a tissue from your body and uses it to find a life-saving cure—one that is worth millions of dollars to a pharmaceutical corporation? Do they owe you some compensation for your tissues?    Do students face harsher treatment for plagiarism than professors do? If so, is that just / justifiable?  Given all these issues, what does Wittenberg’s Code of Academic integrity really mean, and how ought we enforce academic standards of ethical borrowing on this campus?  These are the kinds of questions we will be asking all term.  Obviously, we may not come to any clear consensus on these questions, but it’s my hope that by asking these questions you will: arrive at a richer understanding of your own writing/creative process, learn to think more carefully about how to ethically work with the ideas / words of others, and better understand the academic rules that govern this process for college-level writing.  4 major papers, including a short research project, with lots of writing in between.

English 101E – Introduction to Expository Writing
4 semester hours
Erwin, Bonnie

In this class we’ll practice the fundamental skills necessary for successful college writing.  We’ll target core habits of critical reading and thinking that are essential to developing good ideas, and we’ll use a variety of writing assignments to practice turning good ideas into good papers.  We’ll write multiple drafts of each paper, using small group workshops and one-on-one conferences to practice valuable strategies for revision.  Grades will be based on four formal papers (a personal narrative, two analytical papers, and a researched argument paper) as well as informal writing assignments and class participation. 
Our readings and writings are organized around a theme:  “Eating our Words.”  We’ll examine the rhetoric surrounding food (its production, marketing, consumption, etc.) in contemporary America, and we’ll focus in particular on how discourses about food intersect with important discussions of subjects like gender, race, and class.  Food can seem to be merely an issue of “nature,” because of course any animal needs food to survive.  Yet for writers, food is more often an issue of “culture,” and we’ll investigate how such writing allows authors to engage complex questions about who we are, who we should be, and how we should relate to one another.

English 101E–Expository Writing: Relationships in the Age of Technology
4 semester hours
Inboden, Robin

Our primary goal in this course is, of course, to improve your skills as a writer of expository prose.  To that end, we will do a lot of writing of various kinds, focusing on critical thinking, organizational skills, sentence structure, style, and argumentation.  After a series of assignments of growing length and complexity, we will ultimately complete a short researched argument.  Success in the course will depend on thoughtful reading, active participation and serious work through the process of revision as well as, of course, on the quality of the final papers.  Our readings will center around the way our social networking, our dependency on the internet, and our love of our gadgets may affect the way we think of ourselves and the way we form and define our relationships to other people.  Writing Intensive.

English 180 – A Sense of Wonder:  Science Fiction in Literature
4 semester hours
McClelland, Michael

Prerequisite:  ENGL 101E
Time travel, alien contact, alternate worlds, transformative new technology, and just what the heck is out there anyway? From Shelley to Stephenson, science fiction writers have always asked questions that provoke a deep sense of wonder. In this course we’ll look at some of the best of those stories, in short fiction, novels and film. We’ll discuss the elements of society that inspired and were inspired by those stories, and see if we can’t find ways to express the wonder in our own lives and time.

Course requirements will include several short papers, a final exam and a final paper. You will be expected to come to class having read the day’s assignment, and to be ready to participate in what should be lively and sometimes controversial discussion. Writing intensive.

English 180 – “By Any Means Necessary”:  African-American Literature and Political Resistance
4 semester hours
Askeland, Lori

Prerequisite:  ENGL 101E
400 years of trans-Atlantic slavery, 100 years of Jim Crow, and a legacy of structural racism.  Black writers in the “land of the free” have had no choice but to fight the power.  Writing is, in itself, a non-violent act of resistance in a world that commits the violence of keeping some people in ignorance—but so were the spirituals that enslaved people sang in the fields, often containing coded messages of freedom or literal escapes.  And while some black writers consistently advocate non-violent resistance, some used their pens to call for the sword.  Or the bullet.  David Walker, for example, printed an Appeal to black people in 1829 that justified violence against white people in self defense.  (He was found dead on his doorstep a little while later).  His friend Maria Stewart, was so radical that she angered both blacks and whites—and she was the first black woman to speak in public in the U.S., at a time when few white women dared to speak publicly (women weren’t even allowed to clap after performances!).  Frederick Douglass justified stealing from any slaveholder, and called black men to arms in the Civil War.  And then the great Ida B. Wells in the post-Reconstruction era wrote exposes of lynching that very nearly resulted in her death.  And of course we’ll spend a lot of time with 20th century writers—Nella Larson, W.E.B. Du Bois, Malcolm X, Loraine Hansberry, Angela Davis, TuPac Shakur, Audre Lorde, bell hooks, Toni Morrison.  This is a writing intensive course—which means you’ll write some papers, but you’ll get a lot of support.  Can be taken as a CLAC course.  Cross-listed:  WMST and AFST.

English 180 - The History of Love
4 semester hours
Reno, Seth

Prerequisite:  ENGL 101E
“What is Love?—Ask him who lives what is life; ask him who adores what is God.” Percy Shelley posed this question nearly 200 years ago, and it embodies a fundamental human impulse. Is love a universal feeling? or an historically-dependent and variable idea? What are the different kinds of love? How does love relate to sex, affection, friendship, companionship, and marriage? How has love shaped and determined ethics, morality, religion, politics, and human experiences? What role does literature play in our understanding of love? To investigate these and other questions, we will explore the meaning and historical development of love through analysis of literature, theory, film, and culture. We will consider the classical concepts of eros, philia, and agape, as well as the concepts of universal love, political love, sexual love, and transcendent love in their various forms. Taking Plato’s Symposium as a starting point for thinking about love in the Western tradition, we will consider a wide range of texts, including the writings of St. Augustine,courtly love during the Renaissance and in the plays of Shakespeare, Jane Austen’s Sense and Sensibility, Tom Stoppard’s The Invention of Love, and a variety of poems, songs, and films.

English 180A – Chick Flicks: From Melodrama to Rom-Com
4 semester hours
Inboden, Robin

Prerequisites:  ENGL 101E
From Bette Davis’ eyes and Joan Crawford’s shoulders to Rita Hayworth’s legs and Judy Garland’s ruby slippers, classic Hollywood stars defined, for better or worse, American ideas of modern womanhood.  But how much has really changed? This course will interrogate women’s changing roles as stars, as filmmakers, and as audience members. We will begin by learning some basic terminology and approaches to analyzing film as an art form.  Centering on the Classical Hollywood Cinema (1930-1960), with comparisons to contemporary films, we will then turn to a thematic and historical consideration of the various kinds of roles assigned to women in different films and film genres, from classic melodrama, screwball comedy, and film noir to today’s rom-com.  We will see how many classical Hollywood movies have created conformist role models for women even while subverting them.  Short readings may include work by Jeanine Basinger, Molly Haskell, Laura Mulvey, Mary Anne Doane, and Mick LaSalle, among others. The graded work of the course will consist of a shot-by-shot analysis, several short papers, and a final exam.  Writing Intensive.  Counts towards Cinema Studies minor and Women’s Studies minor.

English 180 – Long Ago and Far Away:  Fantasy Worlds in Literature
4 semester hours
Erwin, Bonnie

Prerequisite:  ENGL 101E
We know literature is an important vehicle for social commentary, but what happens when writers set their works in the past, in the future, or in an alternative world?  How can characters speak to us when they live in a time long, long ago?  Why do readers crave the chance to observe a galaxy far, far away?   What can we learn from a plot filled with dragons, time machines, or alien plagues? 

Authors have been experimenting with faraway settings for centuries—even Beowulf, one of the oldest works in the English tradition, is set in a mythical past!  Together we’ll read a cross-section of novels, short stories, and poetry that imagine past times, fantastical futures, and alternative realities.  Our literary tour ranges from the 10th century to the present, with stops in the Renaissance, Victorian era, and early 20th century.  We’ll read Victorian forerunners of Steampunk like H.G. Wells, alongside present-day bestselling authors like Cormac McCarthy, Salman Rushdie, and Margaret Atwood. 

Together we’ll investigate how each of these authors comments upon his or her own time and place by using a fantasy setting—and we’ll dream up ways that the fantastical visions of our authors might offer us alternative solutions to problems that preoccupy us even today.

Graded assignments will include four thrilling papers, a mysterious final exam, and valiant daily participation.  Come ready to travel!

English 200 – Introduction to Literary Studies
4 semester hours
Incorvati, Rick

Prerequisite:  ENGL 170H or 180A or 190A/C
This introduction to literary studies has two goals:  to sharpen your current reading skills and to expand the range of reading skills at your disposal.  To accomplish the first goal, we will start from the assumption that reading critically involves knowing the kinds of questions to ask of a text.  With that assumption in mind, we will read works in a variety of genres (poems, fiction, drama), and we will identify the kinds of questions that lead us to some meaningful and satisfying interpretations.  We will also take into account how considerations of genre as well as the features of each specific work help guide us in forming these questions. The second goal of the course, expanding your interpretive skills, will involve testing out a variety of perspectives and assumptions in order to further develop (and complicate) our meaning-making practices. In order to give you ample opportunity to try out some of these interpretive approaches—and also to sharpen your writing skills—we’ll have frequent writing assignments including one 8-10 page literary analysis.

English 240 - Beginning Creative Writing
4 semester hours
Rambo, Jody
Prerequisite:  ENGL  101E
Ask yourself in the most silent hour of your night: must I write? Rainer Maria Rilke advises the young writer. This course is a place to ask, and ask again, this question. In this workshop for beginning writers, the aim of our collective project will be to generate short stories, poems, and works of creative nonfiction that dare to be artful in fresh, original ways. In this studio workshop-style course, students will engage in a series of interlocking writing exercises that will lead them from their first rough conceptualizations of a story, poem, or essay through its completion and revision.  We will be incorporating readings by great contemporary writers into our assignments, to inspire creativity, as well as spark an ongoing process of becoming a writer by reading, for pleasure, first, but also with attention to how other writers form sentences, structure a plot, create characters, employ detail, dialogue, and figurative language to make their art. Students will exchange work-in-progress for peer critique within a constructive atmosphere – offering a testing ground to determine how each piece of writing is connecting with the reader, successfully coaxing him or her into a new state of mind & heart through each piece of writing.
English 240 is Writing Intensive.  It does not meet the Gen.Ed. Arts requirement.  It is a prerequisite for all advanced creative writing courses in the English Department.

English 241—Beginning Journalism
4 semester hours
Fallon, D’Arcy

Prerequisite:  ENGL 101E
This course provides a basic introduction to the practice and principles of journalism, with an emphasis on writing for newspapers. We will discuss news, features, entertainment stories, opinion and sports writing, as well as interviewing skills, ethics, copy-editing, headline writing, and other related topics. Students will be expected to meet deadlines, do frequent in-class writing exercises, and to thoughtfully and constructively respond to their classmates’ stories. Grades will be based on stories produced, occasional quizzes, and class participation. Students will be required to write at least two stories for The Torch, Wittenberg’s weekly student newspaper.  Prerequisite: English 101.

English 242 – Writing Center Theory & Practice
4 semester hours
Mattison, Michael

Prerequisite:  ENGL 101 and Permission of Instructor
This course will focus on writing processes, interpersonal dynamics, questioning techniques, evaluation of writing-in-progress, and rhetorical theory as they pertain to working one-to-one with writers.  This class, designed primarily to prepare writing advisors for the Wittenberg Writing Center, will work closely with the students in a section of English 101 through several writing assignments.  By permission of instructor only--students must apply through the Writing Center.  Writing intensive.

English 280 – British Survey I
4 semester hours
Buckman, Ty

Prerequisite: ENGL 170H, ENGL 180A or ENGL 190A/C
In this survey for English literature from its beginnings to the early eighteenth century, students will be introduced to the writings of a variety of authors working in a variety of genres: sonnet, dramatic comedy, epic poem, essay, novel, and others.  In order to impose some structure on a rather diverse body of writings, we will trace several broad themes across these works while attending to, so far as possible in a course of this type, the historical milieux in which these texts were written and read or performed.  A reading journal, three papers, a midterm and final.  Writing intensive.

English 290 - American Literary Themes and Traditions: American Gothic 
4 semester hours
Hinson, Scot

Prerequisite: ENGL 170, ENGL 180A or ENGL A/C
Through an examination of the American Gothic, its origins and its contemporary manifestations, we will explore the difficult, bloody, and painful birth of American literature as well as its continued fascination with and terror of what Melville called the “power of blackness” and the sublime mixture of terror and beauty.  This course is driven by America’s fascination with Gothic literature, and with what can accurately be described as a Gothic revival in American culture. What is it about the shadowy, diseased, the grotesque, and sublime that so attracts us?  What scares us and what spectral shapes do those fears inhabit in our literature?  This course in the American Gothic is definitely not for the squeamish and requires frequent reading quizzes, one short and one longer researched essay, a midterm and a final, and a group presentation and bibliography.   

English 308 – Anarchy for the U.K.: A Study of Romantic Literature
4 semester hours
Incorvati, Rick

Prerequisite:  ENGL 200 and 280A
This class considers the innovative and challenging writing of the Romantic-era as well as the remarkable cultural events that helped to shape those texts.  We’ll take the anarchist theories of William Godwin as our touchstone as we examine the reformist ideas that permeate writings of the feminist Mary Wollstonecraft, the radical poet William Blake, the proto-Marxist Percy Shelley, and the mad, bad, and dangerous Lord Byron, among others.  These texts will help us to raise some challenging questions about political authority, about individual identities, and about the nature of divinity.  We’ll most likely have three exams and two papers, including one 15-page semester project, in this course.

English 310 – Streams of Consciousness:  Thinking In and Thinking Through Modernism
4 semester hours
Smith, Fitz

Prerequisite:  ENGL 200 and ENGL 280A
This course considers the modernist novel from its most identifiable attribute, its use of the narrative technique known as ‘stream of consciousness’.  But why would those authors of the twentieth-century be drawn to such a technique?  What significance does it contain for their novels?  For their readers?  Our readings will range from the historical to the literary, and will consider both the history and maybe even the future of this once-radical technique.  Focusing specifically on James Joyce’s Ulysses, Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway and The Waves, and William Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury, our conversations will deepen the student’s understanding of modernism’s accomplishments as well as its problems.  Projects will include a daily reading journal, a clutch of short essays, two collaborative presentations, and a well-researched article-length essay.

English 315 - Learning to Live: Contemporary American Fiction
4 semester hours
Hinson, Scot

Prerequisite:  ENGL 200 and ENGL 290A
In the 21st century is it naïve to believe that literature can teach us something about how to live better lives?  At various times throughout history, critics have believed that imaginative literature was mere lies, fabrications, distracting us from reality and more often than not, the work of the devil.  So, why do we read imaginative literature?  In recent decades, literary scholars have taken up, again, the question of morality and literature. What is the relationship between a “good” book and its inherent moral value—are beautifully written books always moral?  Can reading imaginative literature help us to become, in Henry James’ words, “people on whom nothing is lost,” people whose moral sensibilities and empathetic powers are finely tuned?  What, if anything, changes when we read literature in search of moral principles that might help shape our values and beliefs?  In Contemporary American Fiction, we’ll try to answer this question by reading some of the latest fiction being written in North America.  We’ll read in a variety of genres, including magical realism and speculative fiction, and from a range of ethnic literatures.  The course will include writers like Louise Erdrich, Don DeLillo, Joyce Carol Oates, Toni Morrison, Cormac McCarthy, Margaret Atwood, Thomas Pynchon, Marilynne Robinson, Ann Patchett, Jhumpa Lahiri, Susan Straight, and others.  Reading and writing intensive, this course requires frequent reading quizzes, a series of short essays, a comprehensive final examination, and a final research project.

English 318   Bad Girls: From Eve to Mary (Wollstonecraft)
4 semester hours
Richards, Cynthia

Prerequsite:  ENGL 200 and ENGL 280A/Non-majors must have junior standing
This course will examine the work of women writers from the medieval period to the early nineteenth century and will be organized around the most common tropes by which a woman becomes a “bad girl.” I am sure you know those “tropes” already, but to remind you (and to use their less vulgar incarnations) they are: the fallen woman, the shrew, the prostitute, the coquette, and the promiscuous woman. This year, the course will also add a new and modern category for female “acting out;” the mean girl.  The course will begin by looking at the original “bad girl,” Eve, and will examine in detail a period of particularly virulent misogynist attacks during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, all played out through an examination of Eve’s original transgression. We will look at the feminist responses to these debates, including—I would argue—Milton’s representation of Eve in Paradise Lost. 

We will then go back to discuss the shrew or masculinized woman, starting with Chaucer’s Wife of Bath and Margery Kempe’s account of her spiritual life and concluding in Margaret Cavendish’s early foray into science fiction The Blazing World (1665).  We will then move on to the figure of the prostitute, focusing primarily on the Restoration stage and the work of Aphra Behn. From there, we will examine the coquette or the tease, a figure of womanhood intrinsically connected—interestingly enough—with the birth and development of the novel in the eighteenth century. We will also take on a modern category for female transgression—“the mean girl”—by exploring the biting, sometimes catty, satire of Frances Burney’s play, The Witlings. We will conclude with the figure of the promiscuous woman, focusing on the overtly feminist work of Mary Wollstonecraft and how that intersected with the complexities of her own troubled, romantic history. As a coda to the class, we will look at Frankenstein, written by Wollstonecraft’s daughter, Mary Shelley, and examine how the “bad girl” goes underground in this novel, strangely taking the form of a masculine monster.

The course will include a midterm and final, one shorter paper (@five pages) and one researched paper (12-15 pages.) There will also be response papers along the way and the research paper will include a personal component. Writing intensive.  

English 340 - Advanced Fiction Writing
4 semester hours
McClelland, Michael

Prerequisite:  ENGL 240
There is really only one way to become a superior fiction writer: Write, then read, then go write some more.  In this class, we will do plenty of both.  Students will continue developing the skills and techniques introduced in Beginning Creative Writing through readings, discussion, workshopping, journal-keeping and lots of writing.  Each student will produce three short stories and will do a major revision of one of those pieces.  Our goal will be for each student to write at least one story suitable for submission to a literary journal.

English 403 - Special Projects in Creative Writing
4 semester hours
Fallon, D’Arcy

Prerequisite: Senior Standing and Departmental Permission
Special Projects in Creative Writing, English 403, offers to serious creative writing students an opportunity to produce a significant piece of fiction or poetry (or creative nonfiction or screenplay). Unlike the Honors Thesis in which the student works alone with a supervisor, this advanced project combines the group experience of a workshop with the private conference, typically requiring weekly group meetings in workshop format and individual meetings with the instructor in the given genre at least once every two weeks. Admission to the course is based on a writing sample and a brief description of the kind of project the student is proposing.

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