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Course Descriptions

History Course Listings - Spring 2013

HIST 105 C/H 1W.  Pre-Modern World History
4.00 credits
Brooks Hedstrom, Darlene

Prerequisite:  none.
This course considers how in the world ancient history matters in shaping the modern world. We will discard memorization of dates to consider real questions that have historical importance in thinking about the past. We will develop skills in reading, debating and argumentation as we consider issues such as how telling stories about the world reflect core values of society, what medical beliefs about the body tell us about gender roles in the past, what beliefs were foundation to the Islamic empire, how Genghis Khan ushered in the modern age, and to what degree ancient religious beliefs predetermine the political and ethical history of a community. We will read primary sources from period, examine archaeological remains of material culture and read historical fiction as a way to engage with these questions and establish skills in thinking critically about the past.  Reading and writing intensive.

HIST 106C/H 1W.   Modern World
4.00 credits
Proctor, Tammy

Prerequisite:  none.   
This course is designed as an introduction to the larger themes and questions of world history from approximately 1400-present.  Rather than focusing on charting the dates and times of all of the world’s events, we will examine political institutions, economic/demographic trends, and social organizations in order to better understand the world today.  Using a global framework, students will explore the development of modern civilizations in the Near and Far East, Eastern/Western Europe, Africa and the Americas. Assessment will focus on the students' ability to express their ideas in essay exams, quizzes, short papers, and oral presentations.  Writing Intensive.  (This course is required for the History/Integrated Social Studies Major.)

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum:  CLAC
Interested in using your foreign language skills to earn extra credit connected to this course and to learn more about the subject matter of this course at the same time?  If so, register for the CLAC components offered here.  You don’t need to be fluent in the language to exercise this option.  In fact, you need only to have completed two credits beyond 112 or to be currently enrolled in a course beyond 112.  Your work will be guided by your professor and by faculty from the Languages Department.  The CLAC module is designed for intermediate level language learners.

This course offers a foreign language component or CLAC component in the following languages:  Russian, Japanese, Chinese, Spanish, French, German

Students who select the CLAC option will complete work in a foreign language that will supplement the work in this course.  Students who complete the CLAC assignments successfully will earn 1 credit for the CLAC component.

To register for the CLAC component, you must also register for a one-credit LANG 230 CLAC module listed among the Language Department’s offerings.  Meeting times and location will be arranged at the beginning of the semester.    Credit for CLAC modules may be counted toward the requirements for International Studies and as elective credit in the Language department.

HIST 111H 01.  Medieval Europe
4.00 credits
Raffensperger, Chris

Prerequisite:  none.   Supplemental Instruction available.
The origins of medieval Europe are grounded in the world of Late Antiquity. This class begins with the last of the Western Roman Emperors by surveying the “barbarian” kingdoms that had been created in the fourth and fifth centuries. Essential to understanding Europe is the relationship between East and West. Starting with a dominant Byzantium in the early part of our course, we’ll examine ups and downs in the East/West relationship in the ninth and early twelfth centuries and their antagonistic relationship after 1204 and the sack of Constantinople. The traditional narrative of the middle ages (Charlemagne’s coronation as emperor, the Viking raids throughout Europe, the rise of the Normans and the conquest of England, the reform papacy and the Crusades, and the beginning of the Renaissance) will be woven in with the history of eastern Europe and Scandinavia, as well as the histories of women and religious minorities to create a much broader medieval world than is traditionally imagined. Medieval Europe changed drastically over the thousand years studied in this course, and we will attempt to both understand the events and processes that contributed to that change as well as the shape of Europe at the end of our period.
This course counts toward the PAST minor.  

HIST 121H  01. US History I
4.00 credits
Taylor, Thomas

Prerequisite: none.
An introduction to US history from colonization through the Civil War and Reconstruction designed especially for first-year students. The course combines lecture and discussions to develop an understanding the facts and story of American history and to problems in interpreting that story. The course is divided into three units: early America to the revolution; form the revolution into the early republic; and the era of the Civil War. Books include James L. Roark et al, The American Promise, Volume I (4/e ; The Bedford Glossary for U.S. History; John Locke, Second Treatise on Civil Government.  Not writing intensive. Quizzes and tests.

HIST 122H  01.  US History II
4.00 credits
Staff

Prerequisite:   none.
How did new technology change the lives of average Americans in the late nineteenth century?  What role did American women play in World War I?  How did the Civil Rights Movement change American society?  How and why did Harry Truman decide to use the atomic bomb on Japan?  How did Americans react to the Vietnam War?  These are just a few of the questions we will discuss in HIST 222, a survey of some of the major themes, topics and issues in American history from 1877 to the present.  We will focus on selected social, political, diplomatic, economic and cultural developments that have shaped the nation, its varied regions and peoples.  This course will consist of lecture, class discussion and numerous reading and writing assignments.  Attendance is very important.  Students will grapple with problems of historical perspective and interpretation, and are expected to participate in discussion, raise questions and form opinions based on material presented in class and in reading assignments.  Students will be evaluated on their participation in class and on their timely completion of all assignments.  (This course is required for the History/Integrated Social Studies Major.  See the history department chair for information on other possible equivalent courses.)

HIST 164C  01.  Modern China
4.00 credits
Maus, Tanya

Prerequisite:  none.
Using primary sources (first-hand accounts), visual media, and scholarly essays, this course examines the sweeping historical changes that have shaped modern China. In particular, we will examine the ways in which individuals interacted with larger internal and external forces to create dynastic and revolutionary change, from the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911), to Republican Nationalism (1912-1949), and into the Mao Era (1949-1976). We will conclude by exploring how this history of change and competing voices has translated into China in the present.  Students’ work will be evaluated through in-class participation, in-class quizzes, presentations and a variety of written assignments.

HIST 172C 1W.  Africa Since 1500
4.00 credits
Rosenberg, Scott

Prerequisite:  none.
This course will examine how African political, cultural, religious, economic, and social institutions have responded to the penetration of outsiders over the last 500 years. These outsiders include European slave traders, missionaries, and colonizers as well as Arab traders and Islamic scholars. The impact of the slave trade and later European colonization will be explored in depth. Africans were not passive victims in their own history, and we will focus on how Africans responded to these challenges and struggled for their independence, and how these movements helped shape the fact of Post-Colonial Africa. It is this dynamic interplay between Africans and outsiders which has shaped the formation of modern Africa.  Assessment will be based on discussions of the readings, four papers as well as a take-home midterm and final.  Writing  Intensive. 

HIST 202  1W.  Hiroshima’s Shadow
4.00 credits
Maus, Tanya

Prerequisite: none.
The course explores how historians write and interpret history by examining the historical debates and historical memory of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in Japan from 1945 to the present. We will consider how the understanding of the atomic bombings and the reasons for the bombings have changed over time in Japanese public discourse by focusing on primary and secondary sources written by Japanese scientists, artists, and literary figures from 1945 to the present. The understanding of Japanese atomic bomb discourse will be deepened by also pursuing the changing historical memory of the atomic bombings in the United States, since the national narratives of the atomic bombing in the US and Japan are deeply intertwined. This course will engage students in the study of the diverse perspectives within Japan regarding the atomic bombing. In particular, the course will look at differing atomic bomb narratives (for example, those of Korean victims of the bombing and current cancer victims that continue trace their illness to the atomic bombings) in Japan that have been often excluded from public memory and that struggle to survive in the face of erasure from the political center. Students’ work will be evaluated through in-class participation, in-class quizzes, presentations and a variety of written assignments. Writing Intensive.

HIST 203H  1W.  Craft:  Negro Leagues
4.00 credits
Rosenberg, Scott

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
The course will focus on the Negro Leagues that existed in the United States from the early 20th century until the late 1960s. We will also explore the experience of black baseball players both before and after the period of segregation in the United States. While it is essential that we come to grips with the broader political, social, and economic institutions that supported racial segregation, the main focus of this course is to expose the lives that black baseball players made for themselves. In exploring the lives of African-American baseball players, we will focus on an emerging culture and the evolution of race relations. Of particular interest will be the few successful Negro Leagues that operated from 1919 through the 1940s and the long process of breaking baseball's color barrier from 1946 through the 1960s. This course is designed to teach students the basic skills of researching and writing a historical paper. Assessment will be based on a book review, two take home exams, and the main component of the grade will be based on the research assignments and final paper. Writing intensive.

HIST 210C/H  01.  Mummies, Myths and Monuments of Egypt
4.00 credits
Brooks-Hedstrom, Darlene

Prerequisite:  none.
Ancient Egypt is a subject that fascinates the American imagination. This course will consider the American discovery of Egypt through the work of famous archaeologists and historians. With this foundation, we will examine the over 3,000 years of history that shape what is known of ancient Egypt from the great pyramid builders of the Old Kingdom, to the great poets of the Middle Kingdom, to the great apex of Egyptian power under the pharaohs of the New Kingdom. The course will conclude with an examination of the last century of Egyptian history under the invading empires of the Kushites, the Persians, and the Greeks. This is a survey class that will require intensive reading in both primary (both textual and artifactual evidence) and secondary sources on Egypt.  

HIST253C/H  1W.  Soviet Russia
4.00 credits
Raffensperger, Chris

Prerequisite:  none.
Russia in this period is fully enmeshed in European and world history. Over the course of this class we will see Soviet troops in Berlin, as well Soviet activity throughout the world.  Russia also goes through a series of dramatic changes in this period from the amazing events of two revolutions in 1917 to the conservative reaction under Stalin, and repetitions of those cycles of reform and reaction throughout the twentieth century. The history of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics will change the history of the rest of the world, and as such, is a vital component in understanding not only the events of the twentieth century, but our twenty-first century as well.
Writing Intensive

HIST263C  01.  Japan’s Medieval Past
4.00 credits
Maus, Tanya

Prerequisite:  none. 
Japan’s Medieval Past is most often viewed through the rise of a ruling warrior (samurai) class. However, long before the age of the samurai, civil officials, aristocratic women, monks, and wandering performers created an unprecedented age of political, social, artistic and literary achievement that drew on rich and diverse traditions from within and without Japan. Through the use of primary historical sources, literature, and classic film by directors such as Akira Kurosawa and Mizoguchi Kenji, this course will examine Japan’s complex medieval heritage beginning with the rise of a stable imperial rule in the sixth century and ending with the anarchy of the warring states period of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. Students will be evaluated according to quizzes, weekly journal responses, a variety of written assignments, and two substantial class presentation.  This course counts toward the PAST minor.

HIST318  1W.  Nazi and Fascist Europe
4.00 credits
Proctor, Tammy

Prerequisite:  One course in history or permission of instructor.
This course will explore the development of fascism and national socialism and their impacts on European history from 1919 to 1945.  In particular, students will be asked to read and write intensively in an attempt to better understand these political ideologies in their various forms in Eastern and Western Europe.  While the focus will be primarily on Germany and Italy, the class will also examine the ideological roots of fascism and its manifestations in a variety of European settings.  Assignments will include reading presentations in class, analytical papers, a 15-page research paper, and class participation.  

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum:  CLAC
Interested in using your foreign language skills to earn extra credit connected to this course and to learn more about the subject matter of this course at the same time?  If so, register for the CLAC components offered here.  You don’t need to be fluent in the language to exercise this option.  In fact, you need only to have completed two credits beyond 112 or to be currently enrolled in a course beyond 112.  Your work will be guided by your professor and by faculty from the Languages Department.  The CLAC module is designed for intermediate level language learners.

This course offers a foreign language component or CLAC component in the following languages:  Russian, Spanish, French, German

Students who select the CLAC option will complete work in a foreign language that will supplement the work in this course.  Students who complete the CLAC assignments successfully will earn 1 credit for the CLAC component.

To register for the CLAC component, you must also register for a one-credit LANG 230 CLAC module listed among the Language Department’s offerings.  Meeting times and location will be arranged at the beginning of the semester.    Credit for CLAC modules may be counted toward the requirements for International Studies and as elective credit in the Language department.

HIST 370  1W. Migrant Labor and AIDS in Southern Africa .
4.00 credits
Rosenberg, Scott

Prerequisite:  One course in history or permission of instructor.
This class will examine the connection between colonial policies that led to the development of a migrant labor system and the eventual explosion of AIDS in southern Africa in the late 1980s through the present. The colonial powers stripped Africans of their land and imposed taxes on men to force them into migrant labor, tearing apart the African family. Once at the mines/urban areas, the colonial powers relied partially on alcohol and prostitution as a means of controlling African labor. The social and economic patterns established during colonial rule created the conditions for the spread of AIDS.  We will also look at the origins of AIDS in Africa, and how it has spread. Lastly, this class will examine how African cultural attitudes have influenced the fight to stop the spread of AIDS.  The class will mix lectures with the discussion of several monographs. Grades will be based on papers.  Writing intensive.

HIST 411 1W.   Senior Seminar
4.00 credits
Raffensperger, Chris

Prerequisite:  Senior history majors only and HIST 202, HIST 203, and HIST 390.
The primary focus of the course is on a senior-level research paper, on a topic of the student’s choosing and in accord with the student’s previous course work.  The course also includes discussion of differing philosophies of history and of the evolution of the discipline of history.   Quizzes and research paper.   Writing Intensive.

HIST 490 00.  Independent Study
1.00-4.00 credits
Staff
Prerequisite:  Permission only.

HIST 491 00.   Internship
1:00-4.00 credits
Staff
Prerequisite:  Permission only.

HIST 499 00.   Senior Honors Thesis
0.00-8.00 credits
Staff

Prerequisite:  Permission only.
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