Myes Hall

Course Descriptions

Foreign Languages and Literatures Course Listings - Spring 2013

Cultures and Languages Across the Curriculum:  CLAC
(LANG 270/LANG370)

Wittenberg offers a distinctive, nationally recognized Cultures and Language Across the Curriculum Program (CLAC) that allows students to use their language skills in a wide variety of disciplines.  You can read about the program in USA Today by following this link: 

http://www.usatoday.com/news/education/2010-07-24-IHE_languages24_ST_N.htm

This courses listed below offer students the opportunity to earn an additional credit by completing a CLAC  module.  Prerequisite:  You must either have completed or be enrolled in a 3rd semester language course (any language course numbered above 112).

In the CLAC program, you will work with your professor and a member of the language department to design and complete a project directly related to what you’re learning in the course and tailored to your skill level in the language.  CLAC offers you the chance to use your knowledge of another language to further your study of another discipline.  You’ll discover that even with an intermediate knowledge of a foreign (i.e.  one course beyond 112), you can make discoveries about the material you’re studying and share your insights with your colleagues.  CLAC offers you the opportunity to use your language skills in a real world setting and to gain insight into how culture and language intersect with the academic disciplines that interest you.  The CLAC module will be listed on your transcript and indicate in which course you had your CLAC experience.  Your transcript will demonstrate to potential employers or graduate schools that you have used your knowledge of a foreign language to engage in meaningful work in a discipline.  CLAC modules also count toward the language requirement for International Studies majors and minors.

To register for a CLAC experience in this course, speak with your instructor in the first two weeks of classes. 

New courses and courses featured especially for Spring 2013: 

Art 130C, Non-Western Art, Glowski
Art 230H/1W, Baroque and Rococo Art, Gimenez-Berger
Art 340/1W, Modern Art, Gimenez-Berger
Chemistry 281, Analytical Chemistry, Cline
Chemistry 300, Junior Seminar, Cline,
Chemistry 400, Senior Seminar Cline,
Communication 290S, Media Literacy, Smith
History 106, Modern World, Proctor
History 318, Nazi and Fascist Europe, Proctor
Honors 300A, Hitchcock’s Cinema, Inboden
Psychology, 150S, Abnormal Proseminar V, Little
Psychology, 280, Introduction to Clinical Psychology, Little
Psychology 280C, Psychology and Culture, Crane
Sociology 101S, Introduction to Sociology, Pankhurst
Sociology 301S, Politics and Religion:  America and Worldwide, Pankhurst

Comprehensive List of Courses offering CLAC modules (if you are taking one of these classes, please speak with the professor if you are interested in completing a CLAC module associated with the course):

  • Art 280 (Honors 300), Art and Culture of Pre-Columbian Mesoamerica, Gimenez-Berger
  • Art 280 (Honors 300), Gender and Genius in Art, Gimenez-Berger
  • Art 340, Modern Art, Gimenez-Berger
  • Biology 221, Pharmacology, Pederson
  • Biology 310, Molecular Biology, Goodman
  • Business 250, International Business, Khayat
  • Chemistry 100, Chemistry and Society, Hanson
  • Chemistry 121, Models of Chemical Systems, Finster
  • Chemistry 302, Organic Chemistry, Hanson
  • Chemistry 281, Analytical Chemistry, Cline
  • Chemistry 300/400, Junior and Senior Seminar, Cline
  • Communication 222, Graphic Storytelling, Smith
  • Communication 290, Media Literacy, Smith
  • Communication 328, Intercultural Communication, Broz
  • Computer Science 260, Computational Models and Methods, Stahlberg
  • Economics 220, Economics of Developing Areas, Frost
  • Economics 240, American Economic History, Frost
  • Economics 275, Economies in Transition, Frost
  • Economics 290, Economies of China, Frost
  • Education 103, Sociological Perspectives in Education, Yontz
  • Education 150, Phonics for Reading & Writing, Calabrese
  • Education 150, Phonics for Reading & Writing, Linder
  • English 180, Film noir, Hinson
  • English 290, American Literary Traditions, Askeland
  • English 290, American Gothic, Hinson
  • English 180, “By Any Means Necessary”: Radical Politics and African American Literature, Askeland
  • English 180, Social Justice – Gay and Lesbian Literature, Incorvati
  • English 180, Sense of Wonder, Science Fiction Literature, McClelland
  • Honors 300, Orphans and Adoption in History and Literature, Askeland
  • English 308, Study of Romantic Literature, Incorvati
  • English 318, Bad Girls, Richards
  • English 380, Mobility in American Autobiography, Askeland
  • Geography 120, Human Ecology, Scholl
  • Geography 250, China’s Geography, Lenz
  • Geology 111, Earthquakes and Volcanoes, Bladh
  • History 101, Modern Japan, Maus
  • History 106, Modern World, Wood, Proctor
  • History 111, Medieval Civilization, Livingstone
  • History 202, Hiroshima’s Shadows, Maus
  • History 203, Fact and Fiction in The Deviance Code, Livingstone
  • History 203, The Great War, Proctor
  • History 227, U.S. since 1945, Wood
  • History 240, The Crusades, Livingstone
  • History 251, Russia to 1796, Raffensperger
  • History 301, Satire and Rebellion in Early Modern Japan, Maus
  • Marine Science 200, Oceanography, Welch
  • Mathematics 210, Fundamentals of Analysis, Parker
  • Mathematics 215, Differential Equations, Parker
  • Music 124, Applied Voice, McCormack
  • Music 324, Applied Voice, McCormack
  • Music 185, Wittenberg Choir, Con
  • Music 187, Wittenberg Singers, Con
  • Music 463, General Music Methods, Con
  • Philosophy 200, Race, Gender, Science and Medicine, McHugh
  • Philosophy 204, Philosophy of Women’s Lives, McHugh
  • Philosophy 304, Knowing Bodies, McHugh
  • Philosophy 311, Modern Philosophy, McHugh
  • Physics 102B, Physics Through Experimentation , George
  • Physics 107, Astronomy, Fleisch
  • Physics 220, Modern Physics, George
  • Physics 360/ 460, Junior & Senior Seminar, George
  • Political Science 205, Chinese Politics, Yu
  • Political Science 210, East Asian Politics, Yu
  • Political Science 224, American Presidency, Hasecke
  • Political Science 259, International Political Economy, Allan
  • Political Science 305, European Politics, Allan
  • Political Science 350, American Foreign Policy, Yu
  • Political Science 354, Chinese Foreign Policy, Yu
  • Psychology 150, Proseminar V—Abnormal, Little
  • Psychology 251, Abnormal Psychology, Little
  • Psychology 280, Psychology and Culture, Crane
  • Religion 134, Chinese and Japanese Religious Traditions, Oldstone-Moore
  • Religion 177, Religious Perspectives on Contemporary Moral Issues,  Nelson
  • Religion 200, Pilgrimage, Oldstone-Moore
  • Religion 241, Christian Tradition, Nelson
  • Religion 336, Religious Daoism and Chinese Popular Religion
  • Religion 339, Monkeys, Samurai, and Gods, Oldstone-Moore
  • Honors 300, Bioethics, Nelson
  • Sociology 277, Islam and Islamic Societies, Pankhurst
  • Sociology 340, Sociology of Religion, Pankhurst
  • Sociology 390, Russian and Central Eurasian Societies and Cultures, Pankhurst

Chinese 112F:  Elementary Chinese II
(5 semester hours)
Chan, Shelley

Prerequisite:  Chinese 111 or placement.
Continuation of 111.  Gaining further skill in using putonghua with every day conversational topics will be important.  We will also learn to read and write more of the characters used to represent those concepts. Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.

Chinese 130A/C:  Chinese Women Writers:  Ancient & Modern
(4 semester hours)
Chan, Shelley

Taught in English.  No prerequisites.
Chinese women have been known as the suppressed sex for thousands of years.  Nevertheless, women’s writing has always been an important part of Chinese literature.  Whereas the long history of pre-modern China produced a rather large number of women writers, the concept of “women’s literature” emerged only in the early twentieth century when enormous changes in Chinese women’s social status occurred after the May Fourth Movement of 1919.  Moreover, since 1949 Communist China has witnessed further rapid changes as far as women’s writing is concerned.

This course is a general introduction to Chinese women writers in different historical periods, namely, pre-modern, modern, and contemporary.  To help students understand the gender issue, it provides them with a cultural background from the Confucian patriarchy to the Maoist “equality” between the sexes, as well as a background on cultural norms toward Chinese women.  It discovers women’s voice in a traditionally male-centered society and literature, examines the feminine/masculine opposition, studies how Chinese women writers have not only formed their own voice, but also often led the way in the literary development of the post-Mao period.  The readings, including poetry, prose and fiction, will be buttressed by films.  All readings, discussions and lectures will be in English. The movies will have English subtitles.

Chinese 212:  Intermediate Chinese II
(5 semester hours)
Choy, Howard

Prerequisite:  Chinese 211 or placement
This is the second part of a two-semester course in intermediate Chinese.  Students will continue to develop the basic language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in daily life situations and self-expressions.  It is intended to lay a solid foundation for everyday communication in Chinese and further study of the language.  Students should be prepared for a steady expansion of their vocabulary and are expected to speak the language in classroom activities.  Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.

Chinese 230S:  Language in Society
(4 semester hours)
Imai, Terumi

Taught in English.  No prerequisites.
This course will look at language as it creates and responds to its cultural and social environments. Our main focus will be on the variation in one language, which results from different social statuses and purposes. We will seek to explain as well as describe such facts. Why do regional varieties of US English continue to exist after all these years of mass media influence? Why does one variety of a language gain and maintain such great prestige (the so-called standard variety)? Why are we prejudiced against some varieties of language, and what reasons do we offer for those prejudices? Why do men and women speak differently? Is English a sexist language? If so, what linguistics facts support such an interpretation?  These are some of the questions we will be asking in this course. We will focus on the language variation in English but will also read some articles on Japanese language variation to see if these variation patterns hold among different languages.

Chinese 330/1W:  Chinese Topics:  Translation Workshop
(4 semester hours)
Choy, Howard

Prerequisite:  Chinese 311 or permission of instructor
This is a third year course in advanced Chinese. Students will advance from the basic language skills to the practices and theories of translation from Chinese to English and English to Chinese. By the end of this course, students will have developed skills in translating literary, commercial, legal texts, etc. To create an interactive language workshop, we will adopt a content-based and task-oriented approach, emphasizing knowledge, accuracy, and creativity at the same time. Resource materials will be chosen according to students' academic interests.  Writing intensive.

Chinese 490:  Independent Study
Tutorials for the student who has excelled in previous study of putonghua.  Thematic content chosen according to student's intellectual interests.  Conducted entirely in putonghua.

French 112F/01:  Beginning French II
(5 semester hours)
Adrien, Max

Prerequisite:  French 111 or placement.
Grammar review, composition, oral practice, and reading.  Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.

French 112F/02:  Beginning French II
(5 semester hours)
Wilkerson, Timothy

Prerequisite:  French 111 or placement.
Grammar review, composition, oral practice, and reading.  Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.  Successful completion of this course with a C- or above satisfies the General Education requirement for Foreign Language (F).  Consult the campus bookstore website for required materials, which may be purchased directly from the publisher at http://www.cengage.com/us/.

 French 140A: Monsters and Monstrosities
(4 semester hours)
Adrien, Max

Taught in English.  No prerequisites.
This course aims at examining Francophone Caribbean and African literary and filmic works that address political concerns of the late colonial and post-colonial eras. Among the major themes to be examined are the Western canonic concepts of Monsters and Monstrosities, the Negritude Movement, the concept of Africanity, the linguistic concerns of Créolité, and the pervasive theme of Alienation. Main texts and films to be studied will include Condé, Niane and Zobel. To better appreciate the legacy of colonialism and better understand the Western canonical conceptions of “Monster”, textual reading excepts will be drawn from Plato [Socrates], Saint Augustine, Montaigne, Césaire, Fanon, Sartre and Senghor. Pursuant to Wittenberg’s liberal arts education vision which is “dedicated to intellectual inquiry and wholeness of person within a diverse community”, the main emphasis of the course is to bring to bear the necessary tools that students might need to deal with social /societal issues, ”malaise” / “discontent” such as Monsters, Monstrosities, Identity, Alienation, Otherness, Colonialism, Negritude, etc. Overall, the core principle of this course is critical thinking as a window that will connect students to the global world to enhance their possibilities to be fully engaged in their community as they gain a greater understanding of the human condition. Knowledge of French is not required.

French 230S:  Language in Society
(4 semester hours)
Imai, Terumi

Taught in English.  No prerequisites.
This course will look at language as it creates and responds to its cultural and social environments. Our main focus will be on the variation in one language, which results from different social statuses and purposes. We will seek to explain as well as describe such facts. Why do regional varieties of US English continue to exist after all these years of mass media influence? Why does one variety of a language gain and maintain such great prestige (the so-called standard variety)? Why are we prejudiced against some varieties of language, and what reasons do we offer for those prejudices? Why do men and women speak differently? Is English a sexist language? If so, what linguistics facts support such an interpretation?  These are some of the questions we will be asking in this course. We will focus on the language variation in English but will also read some articles on Japanese language variation to see if these variation patterns hold among different languages.

French 260A/1.1W:  La Vie contemporaine des francophones (Contemporary Francophone Culture)
(2 semester hours)
Wilkerson, Timothy

Prerequisite:  French 112 or placement
Consideration of cultural topics in contemporary life in francophone cultures with a focus on the arts, with a review of lexical and grammatical material appropriate for speaking and writing about various areas of artistic production.  Taught in French.  Successful completion of this course with a C- or
above satisfies the General Education requirement for Foreign Language (F). Consult the campus bookstore website for required materials, which may be also be purchased from the Librairie Gallimard (or any other bookstore) in Montréal at http://www.gallimardmontreal.com/.  Writing intensive. 

French 265H/1.2:  Qui sont les Français?  L’Identité nationale  (Who are the French?  National Identity)  
(2 semester hours)
Wilkerson, Timothy

Prerequisite:  French 112 or placement
This course explores the issue of national identity in Québec, focusing primarily on the Francophone population of the province, through its expression in historical media, including a review of lexical and grammatical material chosen to facilitate discussions of and short writings about historical topics.  Taught in French.  Successful completion of this course with a C- or above satisfies the General Education requirement for Foreign Language (F). Consult the campus bookstore website for required materials, which may be also be purchased from the Librairie Gallimard (or any other bookstore) in Montréal at http://www.gallimardmontreal.com/.

French 304:  Histoire française/philosophie européenne
(4 semester hours)
Adrien, Max

Prerequisite :  4 semester hours of French at the 200 level
This is a content-based course that explores the relationship between European philosophy and continental French history.

French 401:  Thèmes dans la litterature française:  Le Prix Goncourt
(4 semester hours)
Wilkerson, Timothy

Prerequisites:  One 300 level French course
The Prix Goncourt is one of the most prestidgious literary awards in France and, at least according to the French, in the world!  In this course, we will research this celebrated award along with its place in French literary history as well as read a selection of novels by authors who have recently won it.  Taught in French.  Successful completion of this course with a C- or above satisfies the General Education requirement for Foreign Language (F). Consult the campus bookstore website for required materials, which may be also be purchased from the Librairie Gallimard (or any other bookstore) in Montréal at http://www.gallimardmontreal.com/.

French 490:  Independent Study
French 491:  Internship

German 112F:  Beginning German II
(5 semester hours)
Bennett, Timothy

Prerequisite: German 111 or placement.
Explication of grammar, continued oral practice, reading of literary and/or cultural texts, and related explication of grammar.  Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.

German 230S:  Language in Society
(4 semester hours)
Imai, Terumi

Taught in English.  No prerequisites.
This course will look at language as it creates and responds to its cultural and social environments. Our main focus will be on the variation in one language, which results from different social statuses and purposes. We will seek to explain as well as describe such facts. Why do regional varieties of US English continue to exist after all these years of mass media influence? Why does one variety of a language gain and maintain such great prestige (the so-called standard variety)? Why are we prejudiced against some varieties of language, and what reasons do we offer for those prejudices? Why do men and women speak differently? Is English a sexist language? If so, what linguistics facts support such an interpretation?  These are some of the questions we will be asking in this course. We will focus on the language variation in English but will also read some articles on Japanese language variation to see if these variation patterns hold among different languages.

German 261F/1.2:  Umwelt:  Natur und Kultur (Environment:  Nature and Culture)
(2 semester hours)
Bennett, Timothy

Prerequisite:  Successful completion of German 112 or German 200 level placement
This is a content-based reading and conversation course that focuses on the role of the natural environment in the lives of contemporary Germans.  It explores some of the distinctive ways in which those Germans express their regard and concern for the natural world.

German 262F/1.1:  Einführung in die Kunst des Übersetzens (Introduction to the Art of Translation)
(2 semester hours)
Bennett, Timothy

Prerequisite:  Successful completion of German 112 or German 200 level placement
An introduction to the theory and practice of good translation, including a consideration of the demands of translating different types of texts and a consideration of the broader cultural issues inherent in the practice of translation.  Review of advanced grammar topics as well.

German 364H/1W:  Nationalbewusstsein und kulturelles Gedächtnis (National Identity and Cultural Memory)
(4 semester hours)
Bennett, Timothy

Prerequisite:  8 semester hours in German at the 200-Level or permission  of instructor
The course highlights major historical developments that shape the contemporary sense of German identity and examines how these events contribute to the cultural narrative of what it means to be German.  Students will also examine how these narratives change over time to reflect the ways in which different eras look to the past to construct a contemporary sense of community and cultural authenticity.  Writing intensive.

German 490:  Independent Study
German 491:  Internship

Greek 112:  Intermediate Classical Greek
(4 semester hours)
Gorton, Luke

Prerequisite:  Greek 111 or permission of instructor
A continuation of Greek 111.  Emphasis on grammar, exercises, and selected readings. 

Japanese 112F: Beginning Japanese II
(5 semester hours)
Quimby, Joanne

Prerequisite: Japanese 111 or placement
The course continues to introduce the basic Japanese communication skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing.  Students will increase understanding of the Japanese cultural perspective, and gain insight into the nature of language study.  Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.

Japanese 130A/C:  Images of Japan:  A Cultural History of Japan
(4 semester hours)
Quimby, Joanne

Prerequisite:  Taught in English.  No prerequisites.
This course is an introduction to Japanese culture through images—literary and visual representations and other ideas and concepts which have become solidified as “images of Japan” the popular imagination. Through readings, films, artwork, manga, and other materials we will consider major “images” of Japan, and will reflect upon how these images are created, disseminated, reinforced, and/or challenged.

Japanese 212:  Intermediate Japanese II
(5 semester hours)
Imai, Terumi

Prerequisite:  C- or above in Japanese 211 or placement.
The course continues to introduce the fundamental Japanese communication skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing.  Students will begin to utilize the language to establish contacts with people beyond the walls of Wittenberg, and increase understanding of the Japanese cultural perspective.  Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.

Japanese 230A/C:  From Page to Screen:  Modern Japanese Literature in Film
(4 semester hours)
Quimby, Joanne

Prerequisite:  Taught in English.  No prerequisite. 
In this course, students will read and analyze a selection of Japanese novels and short stories, and will then watch film adaptations of the same works. We will consider issues of adaptation, audience response, message/meaning as we consider these works as literary and cinematic arts. We will also discuss cultural and historical background as necessary. This course will equip students with the tools necessary to appreciate and analyze these two art forms of artistic expression, and will provide a forum for them to gauge and reflect on their own reactions.

Japanese 230S:  Language in Society
(4 semester hours)
Imai, Terumi

Taught in English.  No prerequisites.
This course will look at language as it creates and responds to its cultural and social environments. Our main focus will be on the variation in one language, which results from different social statuses and purposes. We will seek to explain as well as describe such facts. Why do regional varieties of US English continue to exist after all these years of mass media influence? Why does one variety of a language gain and maintain such great prestige (the so-called standard variety)? Why are we prejudiced against some varieties of language, and what reasons do we offer for those prejudices? Why do men and women speak differently? Is English a sexist language? If so, what linguistics facts support such an interpretation?  These are some of the questions we will be asking in this course. We will focus on the language variation in English but will also read some articles on Japanese language variation to see if these variation patterns hold among different languages.

Japanese 312: Advanced Japanese II
(4 semester hours)
Imai, Terumi

Prerequisite: C- or above in Japanese 311 or placement.
A continuation of Japanese 311, the goal of the course is to develop culturally and socially appropriate proficiency in the four language skills:  reading, writing, listening and speaking.

Japanese 490:  Independent Study

Russian 112F:  Beginning Russian II
(5 semester hours)
Zaharkov, Lila

Prerequisite:  Russian 111 or placement.
Continuation of 111, practice with conversation and grammatical patterns.  Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.

Russian 130A/C:  Modern Hero
(4 semester hours)
Zaharkov, Lila

Taught in English, no prerequisites.
The “Modern Hero” in Russian culture begins with the fairy tale!  What traits distinguish them from our concept of the heroic or anti-heroic?  We’ll then proceed to the development of the Revolutionary hero who wants to singlehandedly change Russian society.  Join us in this course as we encounter the representation of the hero/ine to the present day and perhaps 600 years into the future!  While examining the “Modern Hero”, readers will be introduced to the best writers of 19th and 20th century Russian literature such as Gogol, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Zamjatin, Bulgakov, and others.  No Russian is required!  All readings, lectures, and discussion in English.  Fulfills either the “A” Fine, Performing, and Literary Arts or “C” Non-Western Cultures General Education requirement.

Russian 230S:  Language in Society
(4 semester hours)
Imai, Terumi

Taught in English.  No prerequisites.
This course will look at language as it creates and responds to its cultural and social environments. Our main focus will be on the variation in one language, which results from different social statuses and purposes. We will seek to explain as well as describe such facts. Why do regional varieties of US English continue to exist after all these years of mass media influence? Why does one variety of a language gain and maintain such great prestige (the so-called standard variety)? Why are we prejudiced against some varieties of language, and what reasons do we offer for those prejudices? Why do men and women speak differently? Is English a sexist language? If so, what linguistics facts support such an interpretation?  These are some of the questions we will be asking in this course. We will focus on the language variation in English but will also read some articles on Japanese language variation to see if these variation patterns hold among different languages.

Russian 262/1.2:  Art of Translation
(2 semester hours)
Zaharkov, Lila

Prerequisites:  Russian 263
Introduction to the practice of good translation including more advanced topics in Russian grammar such as verbs of motion, verbal aspect and verb.  Special attention to idiomatic expressions and formulaic speech patterns. 

Russian 264/1.1:  Voices from the Past
(2 semester hours)
Zaharkov, Lila

Prerequisites:  Russian 260
Students will study the main currents of Russian history through readings, biographies, and films.  Additional grammatical topics for reading Russian will be included.

Russian 316/1.1:  Russian Cultural Traditions
(2 semester hours)

Prerequisite:  Russian 260
An examination of the cultural heritage of Russia.  Short prose works, poetry, cultural readings and films help students develop reading and conversational skills.  Taught in Russian

Russian 490:  Independent Study

Spanish 101/1.1 & 1.2:  Spanish for High Beginners
(2 semester hours)
McIntyre, Christine

Prerequisite:  Workshop or 101 placement or permission of instructor
Designed for students who have had two years or less of previous instruction in Spanish but who are not yet ready to enter a 112 level class.  Course will review essential structures needed to prepare students for 112 classes, focusing upon the communicative structures of reading, writing, listening and speaking.

Spanish 111:  Beginning Spanish I
(5 semester hours)
Staff

Prerequisite:  Placement or permission of instructor
Emphasis on elementary grammar and oral practice.  Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.

Spanish 112F/01: Beginning Spanish II
(5 semester hours)
Henlon, Sheree

Prerequisite:  Spanish 111 or placement.
Grammar, composition, oral practice, and reading.  Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.

Spanish 112F/02: Beginning Spanish II
(5 semester hours)
Henlon, Sheree

Prerequisite:  Spanish 111 or placement.
Grammar, composition, oral practice, and reading.  Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.

Spanish 112F/03: Beginning Spanish II
(5 semester hours)
Garcia, Victor

Prerequisite:  Spanish 111 or placement.
Grammar, composition, oral practice, and reading.  Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.

Spanish 112F/04: Beginning Spanish II
(5 semester hours)
Garcia, Victor

Prerequisite:  Spanish 111 or placement.
Grammar, composition, oral practice, and reading.  Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.

Spanish 130A:  The Border Crossed Us!  Mexico and Mexicans in the United States
(4 semester hours)
McIntyre, Christine

Prerequisite:  No prerequisite.  Taught in English. 
In this class we will study the historic relationship between Mexico and the United States, the peoples and communities of the Southwestern borderlands, and Chicano/Mexican communities in other areas of the United States.  We will discuss current issues between the two countries, especially immigration.  We will also read and work with a variety of literary and cultural texts (novels, poetry, music, art, and film) in order to better understand the identity and perspectives of long-standing U.S. Mexican/Chicano communities, and conflicts with dominant Anglo society.  Taught in English, although some knowledge of Spanish could be useful.

Spanish 150F/01: Intermediate Spanish
(5 semester hours)
Hoff, Ruth

Prerequisite: Spanish 112 or placement.
This course is designed to offer students at the intermediate level an opportunity to acquire communicative skills, improve their formal knowledge of the language, and develop an awareness and appreciation of Hispanic cultures.  Lab component may be completed through an optional Service Learning Program tied to the course.  Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.

Spanish 150F/02: Intermediate Spanish
(5 semester hours)
Blanco, Fernando

Prerequisite: Spanish 112 or placement.
This course is designed to offer students at the intermediate level an opportunity to acquire communicative skills, improve their formal knowledge of the language, and develop an awareness and appreciation of Hispanic cultures.  Lab component may be completed through an optional Service Learning Program tied to the course.  Ninety minutes per week of independent lab time required.

Spanish 230S:  Language in Society
(4 semester hours)
Imai, Terumi

Taught in English.  No prerequisites.
This course will look at language as it creates and responds to its cultural and social environments. Our main focus will be on the variation in one language, which results from different social statuses and purposes. We will seek to explain as well as describe such facts. Why do regional varieties of US English continue to exist after all these years of mass media influence? Why does one variety of a language gain and maintain such great prestige (the so-called standard variety)? Why are we prejudiced against some varieties of language, and what reasons do we offer for those prejudices? Why do men and women speak differently? Is English a sexist language? If so, what linguistics facts support such an interpretation?  These are some of the questions we will be asking in this course. We will focus on the language variation in English but will also read some articles on Japanese language variation to see if these variation patterns hold among different languages.

Spanish 260/1.1:  El mundo contemporáneo (Contemporary Issues of the Hispanic World) 
(2 semester hours)
Blanco, Fernando

Prerequisite:  Spanish 112, 150 or placement examination.
This course aims to develop students’ knowledge in relevant contemporary issues currently modeling the life and destiny of Hispanic countries in relation to the world.  The course also includes a review of some of the most complex aspects of Spanish grammar, and expands vocabulary for conversation.

Spanish 263/1.2:  El cine y el cambio social (Film and Social Change)
(2 semester hours)
Blanco, Fernando

Prerequisites:  Spanish 112, 150 or 200 level placement
This course introduces students to films from Spain and Latin America that intersect with social and historical transitions.  Students will explore the cultural context of each film, analyze major themes, and discuss the role of film as a reflection of and catalyst for social change.  Course also includes selected grammar topics and focuses on colloquial vocabulary that triggers opportunities for class conversation.

Spanish 264/1.1W:  Voces del pasado (Voices of the Past)
(2 semester hours)
Hoff, Ruth

Prerequisites:  Four semester hours of 200-level courses in Spanish
This course gives students the opportunity to gain an understanding of the Spanish-speaking world by examining its rich cultural heritage.  Through reading and writing activities, student learners will explore the complexity of the Hispanic world and how historical events have influenced human contact.  The course will help students develop language skills for description and narration in the past.  Writing intensive.

Spanish 265/1.2W:  La diversidad en el mundo hispano (Diversity in the Spanish-Speaking World)
(2 semester hours)
Hoff, Ruth

Prerequisites:  Four semester hours of 200-level courses in Spanish
This course will provide students the opportunity to explore human diversity in the Spanish-speaking world, in both historical and contemporary contexts.  Through reading, viewing and writing activities students will gain an understanding of the complexities of identity, ethnicity, and multiculturalism across the Hispanic world, including the United States.  The course will aid students in developing language skills to express and support opinion.  Writing intensive.

Spanish 350H/1W:  Spanish Peninsular Civilization
(4 semester hours)
Hoff, Ruth

Prerequisite:  Eight semester hours at the 200 level including Spanish 264 and Spanish 265
Cultural survey of Spain from its earliest history to the present with an emphasis on contemporary Peninsular culture.  Lectures and discussions are supplemented by readings as well as presentations that reflect the history and development of Spanish civilization.  Writing intensive.

Spanish 427:  The Silver Screen
(4 semester hours)
Blanco, Fernando

Prerequisite:  One 300 level Spanish class taught in Spanish
This course will familiarize students with the history of film in the Hispanic world.  Students will view works by prominent directors from Spain and the Americas, as well as explore issues and trends in Hispanic films. 

Spanish 450/1W:  Senior Seminar
(4 semester hours)
Henlon, Sheree

Prerequisites:  Spanish 301 or 302 and one 400 level Spanish course
In-depth study of a literary movement, problem, author, or genre.  Topic to be chosen by instructor.  Required of each Spanish major.  Writing intensive.

Spanish 490:  Independent Study
Spanish 491:  Internship

  • © 2012 Wittenberg University
  • Post Office Box 720
  • Springfield, Ohio 45501
  • Ph: 800-677-7558
Translate This Page
 
English